Make your own free website on Tripod.com
<!--{{{-->
<link rel='alternate' type='application/rss+xml' title='RSS' href='index.xml' />
<!--}}}-->
Background: #fff
Foreground: #000
PrimaryPale: #8cf
PrimaryLight: #18f
PrimaryMid: #04b
PrimaryDark: #014
SecondaryPale: #ffc
SecondaryLight: #fe8
SecondaryMid: #db4
SecondaryDark: #841
TertiaryPale: #eee
TertiaryLight: #ccc
TertiaryMid: #999
TertiaryDark: #666
Error: #f88
/*{{{*/
body {background:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}

a {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
a:hover {background-color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
a img {border:0;}

h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6 {color:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]]; background:transparent;}
h1 {border-bottom:2px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}
h2,h3 {border-bottom:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}

.button {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.button:hover {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; border-color:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]];}
.button:active {color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]];}

.header {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
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.headerForeground {color:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.headerForeground a {font-weight:normal; color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]];}

.tabSelected{color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]];
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.tabUnselected {color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
.tabContents {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}
.tabContents .button {border:0;}

#sidebar {}
#sidebarOptions input {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]];}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel a {border:none;color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel a:hover {color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel a:active {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]]; background:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}

.wizard {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
.wizard h1 {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; border:none;}
.wizard h2 {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border:none;}
.wizardStep {background:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];
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.wizardFooter {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]];}
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.wizard .button {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; border: 1px solid;
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.wizard .notChanged {background:transparent;}
.wizard .changedLocally {background:#80ff80;}
.wizard .changedServer {background:#8080ff;}
.wizard .changedBoth {background:#ff8080;}
.wizard .notFound {background:#ffff80;}
.wizard .putToServer {background:#ff80ff;}
.wizard .gotFromServer {background:#80ffff;}

#messageArea {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
#messageArea .button {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]]; border:none;}

.popupTiddler {background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]]; border:2px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}

.popup {background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]]; color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]]; border-left:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]]; border-top:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]]; border-right:2px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]]; border-bottom:2px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}
.popup hr {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; border-bottom:1px;}
.popup li.disabled {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
.popup li a, .popup li a:visited {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border: none;}
.popup li a:hover {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border: none;}
.popup li a:active {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border: none;}
.popupHighlight {background:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
.listBreak div {border-bottom:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.tiddler .defaultCommand {font-weight:bold;}

.shadow .title {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.title {color:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]];}
.subtitle {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.toolbar {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
.toolbar a {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}
.selected .toolbar a {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
.selected .toolbar a:hover {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}

.tagging, .tagged {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]]; background-color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]];}
.selected .tagging, .selected .tagged {background-color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
.tagging .listTitle, .tagged .listTitle {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]];}
.tagging .button, .tagged .button {border:none;}

.footer {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}
.selected .footer {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}

.sparkline {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]]; border:0;}
.sparktick {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]];}

.error, .errorButton {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; background:[[ColorPalette::Error]];}
.warning {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]];}
.lowlight {background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}

.zoomer {background:none; color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]]; border:3px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}

.imageLink, #displayArea .imageLink {background:transparent;}

.annotation {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border:2px solid [[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]];}

.viewer .listTitle {list-style-type:none; margin-left:-2em;}
.viewer .button {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]];}
.viewer blockquote {border-left:3px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.viewer table, table.twtable {border:2px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}
.viewer th, .viewer thead td, .twtable th, .twtable thead td {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.viewer td, .viewer tr, .twtable td, .twtable tr {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.viewer pre {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]];}
.viewer code {color:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]];}
.viewer hr {border:0; border-top:dashed 1px [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]]; color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.highlight, .marked {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]];}

.editor input {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
.editor textarea {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]]; width:100%;}
.editorFooter {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
.readOnly {background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]];}

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#backstageArea a {background:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; border:none;}
#backstageArea a:hover {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; }
#backstageArea a.backstageSelTab {background:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
#backstageButton a {background:none; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; border:none;}
#backstageButton a:hover {background:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; border:none;}
#backstagePanel {background:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; border-color: [[ColorPalette::Background]] [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]] [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]] [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}
.backstagePanelFooter .button {border:none; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.backstagePanelFooter .button:hover {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
#backstageCloak {background:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; opacity:0.6; filter:'alpha(opacity=60)';}
/*}}}*/
/*{{{*/
* html .tiddler {height:1%;}

body {font-size:.75em; font-family:arial,helvetica; margin:0; padding:0;}

h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6 {font-weight:bold; text-decoration:none;}
h1,h2,h3 {padding-bottom:1px; margin-top:1.2em;margin-bottom:0.3em;}
h4,h5,h6 {margin-top:1em;}
h1 {font-size:1.35em;}
h2 {font-size:1.25em;}
h3 {font-size:1.1em;}
h4 {font-size:1em;}
h5 {font-size:.9em;}

hr {height:1px;}

a {text-decoration:none;}

dt {font-weight:bold;}

ol {list-style-type:decimal;}
ol ol {list-style-type:lower-alpha;}
ol ol ol {list-style-type:lower-roman;}
ol ol ol ol {list-style-type:decimal;}
ol ol ol ol ol {list-style-type:lower-alpha;}
ol ol ol ol ol ol {list-style-type:lower-roman;}
ol ol ol ol ol ol ol {list-style-type:decimal;}

.txtOptionInput {width:11em;}

#contentWrapper .chkOptionInput {border:0;}

.externalLink {text-decoration:underline;}

.indent {margin-left:3em;}
.outdent {margin-left:3em; text-indent:-3em;}
code.escaped {white-space:nowrap;}

.tiddlyLinkExisting {font-weight:bold;}
.tiddlyLinkNonExisting {font-style:italic;}

/* the 'a' is required for IE, otherwise it renders the whole tiddler in bold */
a.tiddlyLinkNonExisting.shadow {font-weight:bold;}

#mainMenu .tiddlyLinkExisting,
	#mainMenu .tiddlyLinkNonExisting,
	#sidebarTabs .tiddlyLinkNonExisting {font-weight:normal; font-style:normal;}
#sidebarTabs .tiddlyLinkExisting {font-weight:bold; font-style:normal;}

.header {position:relative;}
.header a:hover {background:transparent;}
.headerShadow {position:relative; padding:4.5em 0 1em 1em; left:-1px; top:-1px;}
.headerForeground {position:absolute; padding:4.5em 0 1em 1em; left:0px; top:0px;}

.siteTitle {font-size:3em;}
.siteSubtitle {font-size:1.2em;}

#mainMenu {position:absolute; left:0; width:10em; text-align:right; line-height:1.6em; padding:1.5em 0.5em 0.5em 0.5em; font-size:1.1em;}

#sidebar {position:absolute; right:3px; width:16em; font-size:.9em;}
#sidebarOptions {padding-top:0.3em;}
#sidebarOptions a {margin:0 0.2em; padding:0.2em 0.3em; display:block;}
#sidebarOptions input {margin:0.4em 0.5em;}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel {margin-left:1em; padding:0.5em; font-size:.85em;}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel a {font-weight:bold; display:inline; padding:0;}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel input {margin:0 0 0.3em 0;}
#sidebarTabs .tabContents {width:15em; overflow:hidden;}

.wizard {padding:0.1em 1em 0 2em;}
.wizard h1 {font-size:2em; font-weight:bold; background:none; padding:0; margin:0.4em 0 0.2em;}
.wizard h2 {font-size:1.2em; font-weight:bold; background:none; padding:0; margin:0.4em 0 0.2em;}
.wizardStep {padding:1em 1em 1em 1em;}
.wizard .button {margin:0.5em 0 0; font-size:1.2em;}
.wizardFooter {padding:0.8em 0.4em 0.8em 0;}
.wizardFooter .status {padding:0 0.4em; margin-left:1em;}
.wizard .button {padding:0.1em 0.2em;}

#messageArea {position:fixed; top:2em; right:0; margin:0.5em; padding:0.5em; z-index:2000; _position:absolute;}
.messageToolbar {display:block; text-align:right; padding:0.2em;}
#messageArea a {text-decoration:underline;}

.tiddlerPopupButton {padding:0.2em;}
.popupTiddler {position: absolute; z-index:300; padding:1em; margin:0;}

.popup {position:absolute; z-index:300; font-size:.9em; padding:0; list-style:none; margin:0;}
.popup .popupMessage {padding:0.4em;}
.popup hr {display:block; height:1px; width:auto; padding:0; margin:0.2em 0;}
.popup li.disabled {padding:0.4em;}
.popup li a {display:block; padding:0.4em; font-weight:normal; cursor:pointer;}
.listBreak {font-size:1px; line-height:1px;}
.listBreak div {margin:2px 0;}

.tabset {padding:1em 0 0 0.5em;}
.tab {margin:0 0 0 0.25em; padding:2px;}
.tabContents {padding:0.5em;}
.tabContents ul, .tabContents ol {margin:0; padding:0;}
.txtMainTab .tabContents li {list-style:none;}
.tabContents li.listLink { margin-left:.75em;}

#contentWrapper {display:block;}
#splashScreen {display:none;}

#displayArea {margin:1em 17em 0 14em;}

.toolbar {text-align:right; font-size:.9em;}

.tiddler {padding:1em 1em 0;}

.missing .viewer,.missing .title {font-style:italic;}

.title {font-size:1.6em; font-weight:bold;}

.missing .subtitle {display:none;}
.subtitle {font-size:1.1em;}

.tiddler .button {padding:0.2em 0.4em;}

.tagging {margin:0.5em 0.5em 0.5em 0; float:left; display:none;}
.isTag .tagging {display:block;}
.tagged {margin:0.5em; float:right;}
.tagging, .tagged {font-size:0.9em; padding:0.25em;}
.tagging ul, .tagged ul {list-style:none; margin:0.25em; padding:0;}
.tagClear {clear:both;}

.footer {font-size:.9em;}
.footer li {display:inline;}

.annotation {padding:0.5em; margin:0.5em;}

* html .viewer pre {width:99%; padding:0 0 1em 0;}
.viewer {line-height:1.4em; padding-top:0.5em;}
.viewer .button {margin:0 0.25em; padding:0 0.25em;}
.viewer blockquote {line-height:1.5em; padding-left:0.8em;margin-left:2.5em;}
.viewer ul, .viewer ol {margin-left:0.5em; padding-left:1.5em;}

.viewer table, table.twtable {border-collapse:collapse; margin:0.8em 1.0em;}
.viewer th, .viewer td, .viewer tr,.viewer caption,.twtable th, .twtable td, .twtable tr,.twtable caption {padding:3px;}
table.listView {font-size:0.85em; margin:0.8em 1.0em;}
table.listView th, table.listView td, table.listView tr {padding:0px 3px 0px 3px;}

.viewer pre {padding:0.5em; margin-left:0.5em; font-size:1.2em; line-height:1.4em; overflow:auto;}
.viewer code {font-size:1.2em; line-height:1.4em;}

.editor {font-size:1.1em;}
.editor input, .editor textarea {display:block; width:100%; font:inherit;}
.editorFooter {padding:0.25em 0; font-size:.9em;}
.editorFooter .button {padding-top:0px; padding-bottom:0px;}

.fieldsetFix {border:0; padding:0; margin:1px 0px;}

.sparkline {line-height:1em;}
.sparktick {outline:0;}

.zoomer {font-size:1.1em; position:absolute; overflow:hidden;}
.zoomer div {padding:1em;}

* html #backstage {width:99%;}
* html #backstageArea {width:99%;}
#backstageArea {display:none; position:relative; overflow: hidden; z-index:150; padding:0.3em 0.5em;}
#backstageToolbar {position:relative;}
#backstageArea a {font-weight:bold; margin-left:0.5em; padding:0.3em 0.5em;}
#backstageButton {display:none; position:absolute; z-index:175; top:0; right:0;}
#backstageButton a {padding:0.1em 0.4em; margin:0.1em;}
#backstage {position:relative; width:100%; z-index:50;}
#backstagePanel {display:none; z-index:100; position:absolute; width:90%; margin-left:3em; padding:1em;}
.backstagePanelFooter {padding-top:0.2em; float:right;}
.backstagePanelFooter a {padding:0.2em 0.4em;}
#backstageCloak {display:none; z-index:20; position:absolute; width:100%; height:100px;}

.whenBackstage {display:none;}
.backstageVisible .whenBackstage {display:block;}
/*}}}*/
/***
StyleSheet for use when a translation requires any css style changes.
This StyleSheet can be used directly by languages such as Chinese, Japanese and Korean which need larger font sizes.
***/
/*{{{*/
body {font-size:0.8em;}
#sidebarOptions {font-size:1.05em;}
#sidebarOptions a {font-style:normal;}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel {font-size:0.95em;}
.subtitle {font-size:0.8em;}
.viewer table.listView {font-size:0.95em;}
/*}}}*/
/*{{{*/
@media print {
#mainMenu, #sidebar, #messageArea, .toolbar, #backstageButton, #backstageArea {display: none !important;}
#displayArea {margin: 1em 1em 0em;}
noscript {display:none;} /* Fixes a feature in Firefox 1.5.0.2 where print preview displays the noscript content */
}
/*}}}*/
<!--{{{-->
<div class='header' macro='gradient vert [[ColorPalette::PrimaryLight]] [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]]'>
<div class='headerShadow'>
<span class='siteTitle' refresh='content' tiddler='SiteTitle'></span>&nbsp;
<span class='siteSubtitle' refresh='content' tiddler='SiteSubtitle'></span>
</div>
<div class='headerForeground'>
<span class='siteTitle' refresh='content' tiddler='SiteTitle'></span>&nbsp;
<span class='siteSubtitle' refresh='content' tiddler='SiteSubtitle'></span>
</div>
</div>
<div id='mainMenu' refresh='content' tiddler='MainMenu'></div>
<div id='sidebar'>
<div id='sidebarOptions' refresh='content' tiddler='SideBarOptions'></div>
<div id='sidebarTabs' refresh='content' force='true' tiddler='SideBarTabs'></div>
</div>
<div id='displayArea'>
<div id='messageArea'></div>
<div id='tiddlerDisplay'></div>
</div>
<!--}}}-->
<!--{{{-->
<div class='toolbar' macro='toolbar [[ToolbarCommands::ViewToolbar]]'></div>
<div class='title' macro='view title'></div>
<div class='subtitle'><span macro='view modifier link'></span>, <span macro='view modified date'></span> (<span macro='message views.wikified.createdPrompt'></span> <span macro='view created date'></span>)</div>
<div class='tagging' macro='tagging'></div>
<div class='tagged' macro='tags'></div>
<div class='viewer' macro='view text wikified'></div>
<div class='tagClear'></div>
<!--}}}-->
<!--{{{-->
<div class='toolbar' macro='toolbar [[ToolbarCommands::EditToolbar]]'></div>
<div class='title' macro='view title'></div>
<div class='editor' macro='edit title'></div>
<div macro='annotations'></div>
<div class='editor' macro='edit text'></div>
<div class='editor' macro='edit tags'></div><div class='editorFooter'><span macro='message views.editor.tagPrompt'></span><span macro='tagChooser excludeLists'></span></div>
<!--}}}-->
To get started with this blank [[TiddlyWiki]], you'll need to modify the following tiddlers:
* [[SiteTitle]] & [[SiteSubtitle]]: The title and subtitle of the site, as shown above (after saving, they will also appear in the browser title bar)
* [[MainMenu]]: The menu (usually on the left)
* [[DefaultTiddlers]]: Contains the names of the tiddlers that you want to appear when the TiddlyWiki is opened
You'll also need to enter your username for signing your edits: <<option txtUserName>>
These [[InterfaceOptions]] for customising [[TiddlyWiki]] are saved in your browser

Your username for signing your edits. Write it as a [[WikiWord]] (eg [[JoeBloggs]])

<<option txtUserName>>
<<option chkSaveBackups>> [[SaveBackups]]
<<option chkAutoSave>> [[AutoSave]]
<<option chkRegExpSearch>> [[RegExpSearch]]
<<option chkCaseSensitiveSearch>> [[CaseSensitiveSearch]]
<<option chkAnimate>> [[EnableAnimations]]

----
Also see [[AdvancedOptions]]
<<importTiddlers>>
Sharon Kay Penman - When Christ And His Saints Slept
Ellis Peter - Brother Cadfael series, especially
>One Corpse Too Many - TV version available
>Brother Cadfael's Penance
>The Potter's Field
>Dead Man's Ransom
Cecelia Holland - The Earl, a.k.a. Hammer of Princes
Ken Follett - Pillars of the Earth
Geogre Shipway - Knight in Anarchy
Graham Shleby - The Oath and the Sword, a.k.a. The Villians of the Piece
Diana Norman - Morning Gift
Jean Plaidy - Passionate Enemies
Elizabeth Chadwick - A Place Beyond Courage
Haley Elizabeth Garwood - The Forgotten Queen
E.L. Konigsburg - A Proud Taste for Scarlet and Miniver
Juliet Dymoke - The Lion's Legacy
Felicity Pulman - The Janna Mysteries series
High Ranking clerics of Wessex (all level 7-12)

Bernard, Bishop of St. David's - diocese covers western half of Wales on the map, headquarters ~0103, 0204 or just off the map - Bernard disputes primacy of Canterbury and calls himself Archbishop, dies in 1148, replaced by pro-Canterbury cleric David FitzGerald

Uhtred, Bishop of Llandaff - eastern Welsh hexes, except 0109, 0110, 0111 headquarters in hex 0510 (Cardiff area) or adjacent 0511, dies in 1148, replaced by Nicholas ap Gwrgant

?????, Bishop of Cornwall - hex 1207 (St Germans, Cornish: Lannales) - (in the 11th C the real bishopric of Cornwall is merged with Crediton to form the diocese of Exeter)

Robert Warelwast, Bishop of Crediton [Bishop of Exonbury/Exeter] - hex 1010 Exonbury [Exeter] or hex 0909

Rober of Lewes, Bishop of Sulis and Fountall - hex 0514

Roger of Sarum [Salisbury], Bishop of Sherton/Bishop of Melchester/Bishop of Sarum - at Melchester - Roger dies 11 Dec 1139, the post is effectively vacant in 1140 and 1141 as a result of squabbling over appointment of a successor, Josceline de Bohon is appointed to the office in 1142

the following hexes are part of the diocese of Simon, Bishop of Worcester, though most of the diocese is north off-map: 0112, 0113, 0114, 0115, 0116, 0212, 0213, 0214, 0215, 0312, 0313 - Simon dies 20 mar 1150, replaced by John de Pageham

the following hexes are part of the diocese Robert de Bathune, Bishop of Hereford: 0109, 0110, 0111, may be the greedy Bishop of Hereford of Robin Hood fame, dies 16 Apr 1148, replaced by Gilbert Foliot

Seffrid Pelochin, the Bishop of Chichester might be encountered in hexes 0519 or 0919, he is deposed in 1145 for acts of homosexuality and replaced by Hilary of Chichester

Christminster and surrounding hexes are under the jurisdiction of Alexander the Magnificent, Bishop of Lincoln, who rarely gets down that way. he dies 1148, one of the nephews of Roger of Sarun, he spends part of 1139 in prison and briefly switches sides to Empress Maude, spends most of 1145-1147 in the Papal Court

???, Bishop of Barset - just off map to the north, catch-all for random high level cleric encounters

Bishop of Wintoncester is normally among the C7-12 of the land, but the current holder of that title, Henry de Blois, is actually a magic-user

+++All Bishops listed above, except Bernard of St. David's, are answerable to the Archbishop of Canterbury (off map)+++

Rabbi of Wintoncester - Unlike most shnooks, Henry of Blois knows that the highest ranking cleric in Wintoncester is a Jew.  In an emergency he will not hesitate to use his services.

Rabbi of Christminster

need some nuns!
also a couple of druids maybe
Albion - has twelve children Hand, Hyle, Coban, Guantok, Peachey, Brereton, Slayd, Hutton, Scofield, Kox, Kotope, Bowen
Bromion - poetic reason
Enion - wailing woman, elemental earth mother but also connected to life-giving waters, can sing a song of madness, and wail a wail of jealousy and in-fighting
Enitharmon - queen of heaven, associated with the moon and pity, has a Looking Glass that reveals the eternal world
Fuzon - fire
Grodna - earth
Har & Heva - Adam and Eve, able to turn into reptiles, but senile in their dotage
Hela - a divine medusa
Luvah - love, passion & rebellious energy, melted down in the Furnaces of Affliction and his metallic remains are used to create the universe, can take the form of a cloud, his fallen form is Orc
Orc - takes the form of a whale, a serpent or a solar man, force of revolution and revival, can escape chains by turning into a snake, has a spear
Palamabron - pity
Rintrah - fiery wrath of the prophet
Tharmas - mostly peaceful, flees from fights, connected to tongues and speech, laid the foundations of Golgonooza
Thiriel - air
Urizen - represents reason, uses tools to create and constrain the universe and nets to ensnare people,  has a Book of Brass containing all the physical laws of the universe and sins of man, fiat lux voice, pillar of cloud form, has steeds and a chariot that are stolen by Luvah
has many sons (zodiacal and elemental) and daughters of light, three of his daughters hold the Book of Iron, Four Books of Urizen - Gold (science), Silver (love), Iron (war), Brass (sociology), becomes the dragon of the book of Revelations
Urthona - blacksmith, lord of creativity & poetry, earth elemental, connected to the animal the mole, has a daughter Vala who is a Shadow, can bake magic bread
Utha - water
Vala - a shadow but also a power of nature
Biblioll College - Jude the Obscure, Thomas Hardy (based on Balliol College)
Lazarus College - Barchester Towers, Anthony Trollope - instructs secular canons
Rubric College - Jude the Obscure, Thomas Hardy
Sarcophagus College - Jude the Obscure, Thomas Hardy
Sepulchre College - Jude the Obscure, Thomas Hardy
----
Two important factions at Christminster: 

The Scholiasts of Biblioll are dedicated to unearthing tomes in old languages and translating them.  They are also the hardest drinkers at the University.

The Invisible College of Thaumaturgy isn’t an actual college, it’s a covert alliance of teachers that crosses normal college lines.  They are the main teachers of arcane arts at the school.  To avoid drawing attention to themselves their conclaves are always held outside Christminster, usually in London.
These are the leaders of 200 angels in 1 Enoch that are turned into fallen Angels due to their taking wives, mating with human women (producing the Nephilim), and teaching forbidden knowledge.

Amezyarak (also Shemyazaz, Shamazya, Semiaza, Shemhazi, Semyaza and Samyaza) is one of the leaders of the fall from heaven.

Araqiel (also Arakiel, Araqael, Araciel, Arqael, Sarquael, Arkiel, Arkas) taught humans the signs of the earth. However, in the Sibylline Oracles, Araqiel is referred to not as a fallen angel, or Watcher, but as one of the 5 angels who lead the souls of men to judgement, the other 4 being Ramiel, Uriel, Samiel, and Azazel.

Armaros (also Amaros) in Enoch I taught men the resolving of enchantments.

Azazel taught men to make knives, swords, shields, and how to devise ornaments and cosmetics. Mentioned elsewhere as an enigmatic goat or satyrlike jinn that haunts deserts

Baraqel (Baraqiel) taught men astrology

Bezaliel mentioned in Enoch I, left out of most translations due to damaged manuscripts and problematic transmission of the text.

Chazaqiel (sometimes Ezeqeel) taught men the signs of the clouds (meteorology).

Ezeqeel (or Chazaqiel)   taught men the signs of the clouds (meteorology).

Gadriel taught the art of cosmetics.

Kokabiel (also Kakabel, Kochbiel, Kokbiel, Kabaiel, and Kochab), is a high-ranking, holy angel but, in general apocryphal lore and also in Enoch I, he is a fallen Watcher, resident of nether realms, and commands 365,000 surrogate spirits to do his bidding. Among other duties, he instructs his fellows in astrology.

Penemue "taught mankind the art of writing with ink and paper," and taught "the children of men the bitter and the sweet and the secrets of wisdom."

Samyaza (also Shemyazaz, Shamazya, Semiaza, Shemhazi, Semyaza and Amezyarak) is one of the leaders of the fall from heaven.

Sariel (also Suriel) taught mankind about the courses of the moon (at one time regarded as forbidden knowledge), invoked for his protective powers, an angel of healing, benevolent angel of death

Sarquael (also Arakiel, Araqael, Araciel, Arqael, Araqiel, Arkiel, Arkas) taught humans the signs of the earth. However, in the Sibylline Oracles, Araqiel is referred to not as a fallen angel, or Watcher, but as one of the 5 angels who lead the souls of men to judgement, the other 4 being Ramiel, Uriel, Samiel, and Azazel.

Shamsiel, once a guardian of Eden, served as one of the 2 chief aides to the archangel Uriel (the other aide being Hasdiel) when Uriel bore his standard into battle, and is the head of 365 legions of angels and also crowns prayers, accompanying them to the 5th heaven. He is referred to as one of the Watchers. He is a fallen angel who teaches the signs of the sun.

3 Enoch also mentions
Azza [Shemhazai] - tutelary guardian angel of Egypt 
Uzza [Ouza] - tutelary guardian angel of Egypt, teaches the secrets of the heavens, fell when seduced by Naamah
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Hardy’s Wessex material
UtGT - Under the Greenwood Tree (1872)
PoBE - A Pair of Blue Eyes (1873)
FftMC - Far from the Madding Crowd (1874)
RotN - The Return of the Native (1878)
MoC - The Mayor of Casterbridge (1886)
TM - The Trumpet-Major (1880)
W - The Woodlanders (1887)
WT - Wessex Tales (1888)
TotD - Tess of the D'Urbervilles (1891)
JtO – Jude the Obscure (1895)
Wessex Poems and Other Verses


Barsetshire novels by Trollope

The Warden (1855)
Barchester Towers (1857)
Doctor Thorne (1858)
Framley Parsonage (1861)
The Small House at Allington (1864)
The Last Chronicle of Barset (1867)

Barsetshire Pilgrimage, novel by Ronald Knox, conitnues where Trollope left off

Angela Thirkell’s Barsetshire novels
High Rising
The Demon in the House
Wild Strawberries
August Folly
Summer Half
Pomfret Towers
Before Lunch
The Brandons
Cheerfulness Breaks In
Northbridge Rectory
Marling Hall
Growing Up
The Headmistress
Miss Bunting
Peace Breaks Out 
Private Enterprise 
Love Among the Ruins
The Old Bank House
County Chronicle
The Duke's Daughter
Happy Return
Jutland Cottage
What Did It Mean?
Enter Sir Robert
Never Too Late 
A Double Affair
Close Quarters
Love At All Ages
Three Score and Ten, incomplete at Ms. Thirkell’s death, completed by C. A. Lejeune
[Hex Number]  [Hex Name]

Region:

Dominant Terrain:

Adjacent Hexes: 

Known Features:

Encounter Chart:

1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
[Mostly derived from Johann Weyer’s Pseudomonarchia Daemonum, or Hierarchy of Demons]

Aguarès
Agares. The first duke under the power of the east, <is named Agares,> he commeth up mildile [i.e. he appears willingly] in the likenes of a faire old man, riding upon a crocodile, and carrieng a hawke on his fist; hee teacheth presentlie all maner of toongs, he fetcheth backe all such as runne awaie, and maketh them runne that stand still; he overthroweth all dignities <supernaturall and temporall,> hee maketh earthquakes, [lit. "and makes spirits of the earth dance"] and is of the order of vertues, having under his regiment thirtie one legions.

Alocer
Allocer [Alocer] is a strong duke and a great, he commeth foorth like a soldier, riding on a great horsse, he hath a lions face, verie red, and with flaming eies, he speaketh with a big voice, he maketh a man woonderfull in astronomie, and in all the liberall sciences, he bringeth good familiars, and ruleth thirtie six legions.

Amdusias
Amduscias a great and a strong duke, he commeth foorth as an unicorne, when he standeth before his maister in humane shape, being commanded, he easilie bringeth to passe, that trumpets and all musicall instruments may be heard and not seene, and also that trees shall bend and incline, according to the conjurors will, he is excellent among familiars, and hath nine and twentie legions.

Amon
Amon, or Aamon, is a great and mightie marques, and commeth abroad in the likenes of a woolfe, having a serpents taile, <spetting out and breathing> [vomiting] flames of fier; when he putteth on the shape of a man, he sheweth out dogs teeth, and a great head like to a mightie <raven> [night hawk]; he is the strongest prince of all other, and understandeth of all things past and to come, he procureth favor, and reconcileth both freends and foes, and ruleth fourtie legions of divels.

Andras
Andras is a great marquesse, and is seene in an angels shape with a head like a blacke night raven, riding upon a blacke and a verie strong woolfe, flourishing with a sharpe sword in his hand, he can kill the maister, the servant, and all assistants, he is author of discords, and ruleth thirtie legions.

Andrealphus
Andrealphus [Androalphus] is a great marquesse, appearing as a pecocke, he raiseth great noises, and in humane shape perfectlie teacheth geometrie, and all things belonging to admeasurements, he maketh a man to be a subtill disputer, and cunning in astronomie, and transformeth a man into the likenes of a bird, and there are under him thirtie legions.

Asmodée
Sidonay [Sydonay], alias Asmoday, a great king, strong and mightie, he is seene with three heads, whereof the first is like a bull, the second like a man, the third like a ram, he hath a serpents taile, he belcheth flames out of his mouth, he hath feete like a goose, he sitteth on an infernall dragon, he carrieth a lance and a flag in his hand, he goeth before others, which are under the power of Amaymon. When the conjuror exerciseth this office, let him be abroad [brave], let him be warie [courageous] and standing on his feete; <if his cap be on his head> [! if he is afraid he will be overwhelmed], he will cause all his dooings to be bewraied [divulged], which if he doo not, the exorcist shalbe deceived by Amaymon in everie thing. But so soone as he seeth him in the forme aforesaid, he shall call him by his name, saieng; Thou art Asmoday; he will not denie it, and by and by he boweth downe to the ground; he giveth the ring of venues, he absolutelie teacheth geometrie, arythmetike, astronomie, and handicrafts [mechanics]. To all demands he answereth fullie and trulie, he maketh a man invisible, he sheweth the places where treasure lieth, and gardeth it, if it be among the legions of Amaymon, he hath under his power seventie two legions.

Astaroth
Astaroth is a great and a strong duke, comming foorth in the shape of a fowle angell, sitting upon an infernall dragon, and carrieng on his right hand a viper: he answereth trulie to matters present, past, and to come, and also of all secrets. He talketh willinglie of the creator of spirits, and of their fall, and how they sinned and fell: he saith he fell not of his owne accord. He maketh a man woonderfull learned in the liberall sciences, he ruleth fourtie legions. Let everie exorcist take heed, that he admit him not too neere him, bicause of his stinking breath [lit. "because of the intolerable stench which he exhales"]. And therefore let the conjuror hold neere to his face a magicall [silver] ring, and that shall defend him.

Avnas
Avnas is a great president, and appeareth in a flame of fier, but having taken mans shape, he maketh one marvelous in astrologie, and in all the liberall sciences, he procureth excellent familiars, he bewraieth treasures preserved by spirits, he hath the governement of thirtie six legions, he is partlie of the order of angels, partlie of potestats, he hopeth after a thousand two hundreth yeares to returne to the seventh throne: which is not credible.

Aym
Aym or Haborim [Haborym] is a great duke and a strong, he commeth foorth with three heads, the first like a serpent, the second like a man having two * the third like a cat, he rideth on a viper, carrieng in his hand a light fier brand, with the flame whereof castels and cities are fiered, he maketh one wittie everie kind of waie, he answereth truelie of privie matters, and reigneth over twentie six legions.

Baell
<Baell>. Their first <and principall> king (which is of the power of the east) is called Baëll who when he is conjured up, appeareth with three heads; the first, like a tode; the second, like a man; the third, like a cat. He speaketh with a hoarse voice, he maketh a man go invisible [and wise], he hath under his obedience and rule sixtie and six legions of divels.

Balam
Balam is a great and a terrible king, he commeth foorth with three heads, the first of a bull, the second of a man, the third of a ram, he hath a serpents taile, and flaming eies, riding upon a furious [very powerful] beare, and carrieng a hawke on his fist, he speaketh with a hoarse voice, answering perfectlie of things present, past, and to come, hee maketh a man invisible and wise, hee governeth fourtie legions, and was of the order of dominations.

Barbas
Marbas, alias Barbas is a great president, and appeareth in the forme of a mightie lion; but at the commandement of a conjuror commeth up in the likenes of a man, and answereth fullie as touching anie thing which is hidden or secret: he bringeth diseases, and cureth them, he promoteth wisedome, and the knowledge of mechanicall arts, or handicrafts; he changeth men into other shapes, and under his presidencie or gouvernement are thirtie six legions of divels conteined.

Barbatos
Barbatos, a great countie or earle, and also a duke, he appeareth in Signo sagittarii sylvestris,[ In the image of a woodland archer.] with foure kings, which bring companies and great troopes. He understandeth the singing of birds, the barking of dogs, the lowings of bullocks, and the voice of all living creatures. He detecteth treasures hidden by magicians and inchanters, and is of the order of vertues, which in part beare rule: he knoweth all things past, and to come, and reconcileth freends and powers; and governeth thirtie legions of divels by his authoritie

Bathym
Bathin [Bathym], sometimes called Mathim [Marthim], a great duke and a strong, he is seene in the shape of a verie strong man, with a serpents taile, sitting on a pale horsse, understanding the vertues of hearbs and pretious stones, transferring men suddenlie from countrie to countrie, and ruleth thirtie legions of divels.

Bélial
Some saie that the king Beliall was created immediatlie after Lucifer, and therefore they thinke that he was father and seducer of them which fell being of the orders. For he fell first among the worthier and wiser sort, which went before Michael and other heavenlie angels, which were lacking. Although Beliall went before all them that were throwne downe to the earth, yet he went not before them that tarried in heaven. This Beliall is constrained by divine venue, when he taketh sacrifices, gifts, and [burnt] offerings, that he againe may give unto the offerers true answers. But he tarrieth not one houre in the truth, except he be constrained by the divine power, as is said. He taketh the forme of a beautifull angell, sitting in a firie chariot; he speaketh faire, he distributeth preferments of senatorship, and the favour of friends, and excellent familiars: he hath rule over eightie legions, partlie of the order of vertues, partlie of angels; he is found in the forme of an exorcist in the bonds of spirits. The exorcist must consider, that this Beliall doth in everie thing assist his subjects. If he will not submit himselfe, let the bond of spirits be read: the spirits chaine is sent for him, wherewith wise Salomon gathered them togither with their legions in a brasen vessell, where were inclosed among all the legions seventie two kings, of whome the cheefe was Bileth, the second was Beliall, the third Asmoday, and above a thousand thousand legions. Without doubt (I must confesse) I learned this of my maister Salomon; but he told me not why he gathered them together, and shut them up so: but I beleeve it was for the pride of this Beliall. Certeine nigromancers doo saie, that Salomon, being on a certeine daie seduced by the craft of a certeine woman, inclined himselfe to praie before the same idoll, Beliall by name: which is not credible. And therefore we must rather thinke (as it is said) that they were gathered together in that great brasen vessell for pride and arrogancie, and throwne into a deepe lake or hole in Babylon. For wise Salomon did accomplish his workes by the divine power, which never forsooke him. And therefore we must thinke he worshipped not the image Beliall; for then he could not have constrained the spirits by divine vertue: for this Beliall, with three kings were in the lake. But the Babylonians woondering at the matter, supposed that they should find therein a great quantitie of treasure, and therefore with one consent went downe into the lake, and uncovered and brake the vessell, out of the which immediatlie flew the capteine divels, and were delivered to their former and proper places. But this Beliall entred into a certeine image, and there gave answer to them that offered and sacrificed unto him: as Tocz. in his sentences reporteth, and the Babylonians did worship and sacrifice thereunto.
[rival of the angel Phanuel, also called Matanbuchus, Mechembuchus, Meterbuchus in older scripts]

Berith
Berith is a great and a terrible duke, and hath three names. Of some he is called Beall; of the Jewes Berithi [Berith]; of Nigromancers Bolfry [Bolfri]: he commeth foorth as a red souldier, with red clothing, and upon a horsse of that colour, and a crowne on his head. He answereth trulie of things present, past, and to come. He is compelled at a certeine houre, through divine vertue, by a ring of art magicke. He is also a lier, he turneth all mettals into gold, he adorneth a man with dignities, and confirmeth them, he speaketh with a cleare and a subtill voice, and six and twentie legions are under him.

Bifrons
Bifrons is seene in the similitude of a monster, when he taketh the image of a man, he maketh one woonderfull cunning in astrologie, absolutelie declaring the mansions of the planets, he dooth the like in geometrie, and other admesurements, he perfectlie understandeth the strength and vertue of hearbs, pretious stones, and woods, he changeth dead bodies from place to place, he seemeth to light candles upon the sepulchres of the dead, and hath under him six and twentie legions.

Borges
BORGES grants conversation with the dead, and aids in the navigation of Libraries and Labyrinths. BORGES will also give knowledge of fictional locations, and books that have not been written, have yet to be written, and will not be written.

Botis
Botis, otherwise Otis, a great president and an earle he commeth foorth in the shape of an ouglie [lit. 'worst'] viper, and if he put on humane shape, he sheweth great teeth, and two hornes, carrieng a sharpe sword in his hand: he giveth answers of things present, past, and to come, and reconcileth friends, and foes, ruling sixtie legions.

Buer
Buer is a great president, and is seene in this signe [*]; he absolutelie teacheth philosophie morall and naturall, and also logicke, and the vertue of herbes: he giveth the best familiars, he can heale all diseases, speciallie of men, and reigneth over fiftie legions.

Bune
Bune is a great and a strong Duke, he appeareth as a dragon with three heads, the third whereof is like to a man; he speaketh with a divine voice, he maketh the dead to change their place, and divels to assemble upon the sepulchers of the dead: he greatlie inricheth a man, and maketh him eloquent and wise, answering trulie to all demands, and thirtie legions obeie him.

Byleth
Bileth [Byleth] is a great king and a terrible, riding on a pale horsse, before whome go trumpets, and all kind of melodious musicke. When he is called up by an exorcist, he appeareth rough [turgid] and furious, to deceive him. Then let the exorcist or conjuror take heed to himself; and to allaje his courage, let him hold a hazell bat [rod, staff, or stick] in his hand, wherewithall he must reach out toward the east and south, and make a triangle without besides the circle; but if he hold not out his hand unto him, and he bid him come in, and he still refuse the bond or chain of spirits; let the conjuror proceed to reading, and by and by he will submit himselfe, and come in, and doo whatsoever the exorcist commandeth him, and he shalbe safe. If Bileth the king be more stubborne, and refuse to enter into the circle at the first call, and the conjuror shew himselfe fearfull, or if he have not the chaine of spirits, certeinelie he will never feare nor regard him after. Also, if the place be unapt for a triangle to be made without the circle, then set there a boll of wine, and the exorcist shall certeinlie knowe when he commeth out of his house, with his fellowes, and that the foresaid Bileth will be his helper, his friend, and obedient unto him when he commeth foorth. And when he commeth, let the exorcist receive him courteouslie, and glorifie him in his pride, and therfore he shall adore him as other kings doo, bicause he saith nothing without other princes. Also, if he be cited by an exorcist, alwaies a silver ring of the middle finger of the left hand must be held against the exorcists face, as they doo for Amaimon. And the dominion and power of so great a prince is not to be pretermitted; for there is none under the power & dominion of the conjuror, but he that deteineth both men and women in doting [better: "foolish" or "silly"] love, till the exorcist hath had his pleasure. He is of the orders of powers, hoping to returne to the seaventh throne, which is not altogether credible, and he ruleth eightie five legions.

Caym
Caim [Caym] is a great president, taking the forme of a thrush [blackbird], but when he putteth on man's shape, he answereth in burning ashes, carrieng in his hand a most sharpe swoord, he maketh the best disputers, he giveth men the understanding of all birds, of the lowing of bullocks, and barking of dogs, and also of the sound and noise of waters, he answereth best of things to come, he was of the order of angels, and ruleth thirtie legions of divels.

Chax
Shax [Chax], alias Scox, is a darke and a great marquesse, like unto a storke, with a hoarse and subtill voice: he dooth marvellouslie take awaie the sight, hearing and understanding of anie man, at the commandement of the conjuror: he taketh awaie monie out of everie kings house, and carrieth it backe after 1200. yeares, if he be commanded, he is a horssestealer, he is thought to be faithfull in all commandements: and although he promise to be obedient to the conjuror in all things; yet is he not so, he is a lier, except he be brought into a triangle, and there he speaketh divinelie, and telleth of things which are hidden, and not kept of wicked spirits, he promiseth good familiars, which are accepted if they be not deceivers, he hath thirtie legions.

Cimeries
Cimeries is a great marquesse and a strong, ruling in the parts of Aphrica [Africa]; he teacheth perfectlie grammar, logicke, and rhetorike, he discovereth treasures and things hidden, he bringeth to passe, that a man shall seeme with expedition to be turned into a soldier, he rideth upon a great blacke horsse, and ruleth twentie legions.

Decarabia
Decarabia or Carabia, he commeth like a * and knoweth the force of herbes and pretious stones, and maketh all birds flie before the exorcist, and to tarrie with him, as though they were tame, and that they shall drinke and sing, as their maner is, and hath thirtie legions.

Eligos
Eligor, alias Abigor, is a great duke, and appeereth as a goodlie [handsome] knight, carrieng a lance, an ensigne, and a scepter: he answereth fullie of things hidden, and of warres, and how souldiers should meete: he knoweth things to come, and procureth the favour of lords and knights, governing sixtie legions of divels.

Flauros
Flauros a strong duke, is seene in the forme of a terrible strong leopard, in humane shape, he sheweth a terrible countenance, and fierie eies, he answereth trulie and fullie of things present, past, and to come; if he be in a triangle, he lieth in all things and deceiveth in other things, and beguileth in other busines, he gladlie talketh of the divinitie, and of the creation of the world, and of the fall; he is constrained by divine vertue, and so are all divels or spirits, to burne and destroie all the conjurors adversaries. And if he be commanded, he suffereth the conjuror not to be tempted, and he hath twentie legions under him.

Focalor
Focalor is a great duke comming foorth as a man, with wings like a griphen, he killeth men, and drowneth them in the waters, and overturneth ships of warre, commanding and ruling both winds and seas. And let the conjuror note, that if he bid him hurt no man, he willinglie consenteth thereto: he hopeth after 1000. yeares to returne to the seventh throne, but he is deceived, he hath three legions.

Forneus
Forneus is a great marquesse, like unto a monster of the sea, he maketh men woondeffull in rhetorike, he adorneth a man with a good name, and the knowledge of toongs, and maketh one beloved as well of foes as freends: there are under him nine and twentie legions, of the order partlie of thrones, and partlie of angels.

Forras
Foras [Forras], alias Forcas is a great president, and is seene in the forme of a strong man, and in humane shape, he understandeth the vertue of hearbs and pretious stones: he teacheth fullie logicke, ethicke, and their parts: he maketh a man invisible, wittie, eloquent, and to live long; he recovereth things lost, and discovereth [discloses] treasures, and is lord over nine and twentie legions.

Furcas
Furcas is a knight and commeth foorth in the similitude of a cruell man, with a long beard and a hoarie head, he sitteth on a pale horsse, carrieng in his hand a sharpe weapon [dart or spear], he perfectlie teacheth practike philosophie, rhetorike, logike, astronomie, chiromancie, pyromancie, and their parts: there obeie him twentie legions.

Furfur
Furfur is a great earle, appearing as an hart, with a firie taile, he lieth in everie thing, except he be brought up within a triangle; being bidden, he taketh angelicall forme, he speaketh with a hoarse voice, and willinglie maketh love betweene man and wife [or simply "woman"]; he raiseth thunders and lightnings, and blasts. Where he is commanded, he answereth well, both of secret and also of divine things, and hath rule and dominion over six and twentie legions.

Gaap
Gaap, alias Tap, a great president and a prince, he appeareth in a meridionall signe, and when he taketh humane shape [Clm 849 reads: He appears in the form of a doctor when he takes on a human form. He is the most excellent doctor of women, and he makes them burn with love for men.] he is the guide of the foure principall kings, as mightie as Bileth. There were certeine necromancers that offered sacrifices and burnt offerings unto him; and to call him up, they exercised an art, saieng that Salomon the wise made it. Which is false: for it was rather Cham, the sonne of Noah, who after the floud began first to invocate wicked spirits. He invocated Bileth, and made an art in his name, and a booke which is knowne to manie mathematicians. There were burnt offerings and sacrifices made, and gifts given, and much wickednes wrought by the exorcists, who mingled therewithall the holie names of God, the which in that art are everie where expressed. Marie [Certainly] there is an epistle of those names written by Salomon, as also write Helias Hierosolymitanus and Helisæus. It is to be noted, that if anie exorcist have the art of Bileth, and cannot make him stand before him, nor see him, I may not bewraie how and declare the meanes to conteine him, bicause it is abhomination, and for that I have learned nothing from Salomon of his dignitie and office. But yet I will not hide this; to wit, that he maketh a man woonderfull in philosophie and all the liberall sciences: he maketh love, hatred, insensibilitie, invisibilitie, consecration, and consecration of those things that are belonging unto the domination of Amaymon, and delivereth familiars out of the possession of other conjurors, answering truly and perfectly of things present, past, & to come, & transferreth men most speedilie into other nations, he ruleth sixtie six legions, & was of the order of potestats.

Glasya Labolas
Glasya Labolas, alias Caacrinolaas, or Caassimolar, is a great president, who commeth foorth like a dog, and hath wings like a griffen, he giveth the knowledge of arts, and is the captaine of all mansleiers: he understandeth things present and to come, he gaineth the minds and love of freends and foes, he maketh a man go invisible, and hath the rule of six and thirtie legions.

Gomory
Gomory a strong and a mightie duke, he appeareth like a faire woman, with a duchesse crownet about hir midle, riding on a camell, he answereth well and truelie of things present, past, and to come, and of treasure hid, and where it lieth: he procureth the love of women, especiallie of maids, and hath six and twentie legions.

Gusoyn
Gusoin [Gusoyn] is a great duke, and a strong, appearing in the forme of a Xenophilus, he answereth all things, present, past, and to come, expounding all questions. He reconcileth freendship, and distributeth honours and dignities, and ruleth over fourtie [and five] legions of divels

Haagenti
Haagenti is a great president, appearing like a great bull, having the wings of a griphen, but when he taketh humane shape, he maketh a man wise in everie thing, he changeth all mettals into gold, and changeth wine and water the one into the other, and commandeth as manie legions as Zagan.

Halphas
Halphas is a great earle, and commeth abroad like a storke, with a hoarse voice, he notablie buildeth up townes full of munition and weapons, he sendeth men of warre to places appointed, and hath under him six and twentie legions.

Ipes
Ipos [Ipes], alias Ayporos [Ayperos], is a great earle and a prince, appeering in the shape of an angell, and yet indeed more obscure and filthie than a lion, with a lions head, a gooses feet, and a hares taile: he knoweth things to come and past, he maketh a man wittie, and bold, and hath under his jurisdiction thirtie six legions.

Loray
Leraie [Loray], alias Oray, a great marquesse, shewing himselfe in the likenesse of a galant [handsome] archer, carrieng a bowe and a quiver, he is author of all battels, he dooth putrifie all such wounds as are made with arrowes by archers, Quos optimos objicit tribus diebus, [who best drives away mobs from the days (?)] and he hath regiment over thirtie legions.

Malphas
Malphas is a great president, he is seene like a crowe, but being cloathed with humane image, speaketh with a hoarse voice, be buildeth houses and high towres wonderfullie, and quicklie bringeth artificers togither, he throweth downe also the enimies edifications, he helpeth to good familiars, he receiveth sacrifices willinglie, but he deceiveth all the sacrificers, there obeie him fourtie legions.

Marchocias
Marchosias [Marchocias] is a great marquesse, he sheweth himselfe in the shape of a cruell shee woolfe, with a griphens wings, with a serpents taile, and spetting I cannot tell what out of his mouth. When he is in a mans shape, he is an excellent fighter, he answereth all questions trulie, he is faithfull in all the conjurors businesse [commands], he was of the order of dominations, under him are thirtie legions: he hopeth after 1200. yeares to returne to the seventh throne, but he is deceived in that hope.

Morax
Morax, alias Foraii, a great earle and a president, he is seene like a bull, and if he take unto him a mans face, he maketh men wonderfull cunning in astronomie, & in all the liberall sciences: he giveth good familiars and wise, knowing the power & vertue of hearbs and stones which are pretious, and ruleth thirtie six legions.

Murmur
Murmur is a great duke and an earle, appearing in the shape of a souldier, riding on a griphen [vulture], with a dukes crowne on his head; there go before him two of his ministers, with great trumpets, he teacheth philosophie absolutelie, he constraineth soules to come before the exorcist, to answer what he shall aske them, he was of the order partlie of thrones, and partlie of angels, <and ruleth thirtie legions.>

Naberius
Naberius [Naberus], alias Cerberus, is a valiant marquesse, shewing himselfe in the forme of a crowe, when he speaketh with a hoarse voice: he maketh a man amiable and cunning in all arts, and speciallie in rhetorike, he procureth the losse of prelacies and dignities: nineteene legions heare <and obeie> him.

Orias
Orias is a great marquesse, and is seene as a lion riding on a strong horsse, with a serpents taile, and carrieth in his right hand two great serpents hissing, he knoweth the mansion of planets and perfectlie teacheth the vertues of the starres, he transformeth men, he giveth dignities, prelacies, and confirmations, and also the favour of freends and foes, and hath under him thirtie legions.

Orobas
Orobas is a great prince, he commeth foorth like a horsse, but when he putteth on him a mans idol [image], he talketh of divine vertue, he giveth true answers of things present, past, and to come, and of the divinitie, and of the creation, he deceiveth none, nor suffereth anie to be tempted, he giveth dignities and prelacies, and the favour of freends and foes, and hath rule over twentie legions.

Oze
Ose [Oze] is a great president, and commeth foorth like a leopard, and counterfeting to be a man, he maketh one cunning in the liberall sciences, he answereth truelie of divine and secret things, he transformeth a mans shape, and bringeth a man to that madnes [or, "drives insanity away"], that he thinketh himselfe to be that which he is not; as that he is a king or a pope, or that he weareth a crowne on his head, Durátque id regnum ad horam [and makes the kingdom of time endure (?).]

Paimon
Paimon is more obedient in Lucifer than other kings are. Lucifer is heere to be understood he that was drowned in the depth of his knowledge: he would needs be like God, and for his arrogancie was throwne out into destruction, of whome it is said; Everie pretious stone is thy covering (Ezech. 88 [28.13].). Paimon is constrained by divine vertue to stand before the exorcist; where he putteth on the likenesse of a man: he sitteth on a beast called a dromedarie, which is a swift runner, and weareth a glorious crowne, and hath an effeminate countenance. There goeth before him an host of men with trumpets and well sounding cymbals, and all musicall instruments. At the first he appeereth with a great crie and roring, as in Circulo [Empto.] Salomonis, and in the art is declared. And if this Paimon speake sometime that the conjuror understand him not, let him not therefore be dismaied. But when he hath delivered him the first obligation to observe his desire, he must bid him also answer him distinctlie and plainelie to the questions he shall aske you, of all philosophie, wisedome, and science, and of all other secret things. And if you will knowe the disposition of the world, and what the earth is, or what holdeth it up in the water, or any other thing, or what is Abyssus, or where the wind is, or from whence it commeth, he will teach you aboundantlie. Consecrations also as well of sacrifices [offerings, libations] as otherwise may be reckoned. He giveth dignities and confirmations; he bindeth them that resist him in his owne chaines, and subjecteth them to the conjuror; he prepareth good familiars, and hath the understanding of all arts. Note, that at the calling up of him, the exorcist must looke towards the northwest, bicause there is his house. When he is called up, let the exorcist receive him constantlie without feare, let him aske what questions or demands he list, and no doubt he shall obteine the same of him. And the exorcist must beware he forget not the creator, for those things, which have beene rehearsed before of Paimon, some saie he is of the order of dominations; others saie, of the order of cherubim. There follow him two hundred legions, partlie of the order of angels, and partlie of potestates. Note that if Paimon be cited alone by an offering or sacrifice, two kings followe him; to wit, Beball & Abalam, & other potentates: in his host are twentie five legions, bicause the spirits subject to them are not alwaies with them, except they be compelled to appeere by divine vertue.

Phoenix
Phoenix is a great marquesse, appearing like the bird Phoenix, having a childs voice: but before he standeth still before the conjuror, he singeth manie sweet notes. Then the exorcist with his companions must beware he give no eare to the melodie, but must by and by bid him put on humane shape; then will he speake marvellouslie of all woonderfull sciences. He is an excellent poet, and obedient, he hopeth to returne to the seventh throne after a thousand two hundreth yeares, and governeth twentie legions.

Pruflas
Pruflas, otherwise found as Bufas, is a great prince and duke, whose abode is around the Tower of Babylon, and there he is seen like a flame outside. His head however is like that of a great night hawk. He is the author and promoter of discord, war, quarrels, and falsehood. He may not be admitted into every place. He responds generously to your requests. Under him are twenty-six legions, partly of the order of Thrones, and partly of the order of Angels.

Pucel
Procell is a great and a strong duke, appearing in the shape of an angell, but speaketh verie darklie of things hidden, he teacheth geometrie and all the liberall arts, he maketh great noises, and causeth the waters to rore, where are none, he warmeth waters, and distempereth bathes at certeine times, as the exorcist appointeth him, he was of the order of potestats, and hath fourtie eight legions under his power.

Pursan
Purson [Pursan], alias Curson, a great king, he commeth foorth like a man with a lions face, carrieng a most cruell viper, and riding on a beare; and before him go alwaies trumpets, he knoweth <things hidden, and can tell> all things present, past, and to come: [he discloses hidden things,] he bewraieth treasure, he can take a bodie either humane or aierie; he answereth truelie of all things earthlie and secret, of the divinitie and creation of the world, and bringeth foorth the best familiars; and there obeie him two and twentie legions of divels, partlie of the order of vertues, & partlie of the order of thrones.

Queede
also Cweede [Chatterton]

Raum
Raum, or Raim is a great earle, he is seene as a crowe, but when he putteth on humane shape, at the commandement of the exorcist, he stealeth woonderfullie out of the kings house, and carrieth it whether he is assigned, he destroieth cities, and hath great despite unto dignities, he knoweth things present, past, and to come, and reconcileth freends and foes, he was of the order of thrones, and governeth thirtie legions.

Roneve
Ronove [Roneve] a marquesse and an earle, he is resembled to a monster, he bringeth singular understanding in rhetorike, faithfull servants, knowledge of toongs, favour of freends and foes; and nineteene legions obeie him.

Sabnac
Sabnacke [Sabnac], alias Salmac, is a great marquesse and a strong, he commeth foorth as an armed soldier with a lions head, sitting on a pale horsse, he dooth marvelouslie change mans forme and favor, he buildeth high towres full of weapons, and also castels and cities; he inflicteth men thirtie daies with wounds both rotten and full of maggots, at the exorcists commandement, he provideth good familiars, and hath dominion over fiftie legions.

Saleos
Saleos [Zaleos] is a great earle, he appeareth as a gallant [handsome] soldier, riding on a crocodile, and weareth a dukes crowne, peaceable, &c.

Samigina
Gamigin [Gamygyn] is a great marquesse, and is seene in the forme of a little horsse, when he taketh humane shape he speaketh with a hoarse voice, disputing of all liberall sciences; he bringeth also to passe, that the soules, which are drowned in the sea, or which dwell in purgatorie (which is called Cartagra, that is, affliction of soules) shall take aierie bodies, and evidentlie appeare and answer to interrogatories at the conjurors commandement; he tarrieth with the exorcist, untill he have accomplished his desire, and hath thirtie legions under him.

Stolas
Stolas is a great prince, appearing in the forme of a nightraven, before the exorcist, he taketh the image and shape of a man, and teacheth astronomie, absolutelie understanding the vertues of herbes and pretious stones; there are under him twentie six legions.

Sucax
Sucax is a great marquis, and he appears in the likeness of a man, but has a woman's face. He appears to be kind. He most marvellously gives the love of women, and especially of those who are widowed. He gives all kinds of languages near fullness. He can swiftly transport a man from one country to another. He has 23 legions under him

Sytry
Sitri [Sytry], alias Bitru, is a great prince, appeering with the face of a leopard, and having wings as a griffen: when he taketh humane shape, he is verie beautiful, he inflameth a man with a womans love, and also stirreth up women to love men, being commanded he willinglie deteineth [discloses] secrets of women, laughing at them and mocking them, to make them luxuriouslie naked, and there obeie him sixtie legions.

Valefor
Valefar, alias Malephar [Malaphar], is a strong duke, comming foorth in the shape of a lion, and the head of a theefe [or "barking"], he is verie familiar with them to whom he maketh himself acquainted, till he hath brought them to the gallowes, and ruleth ten legions.

Vapula
Vapula is a great duke and a strong, he is seene like a lion with griphens wings, he maketh a man subtill and wonderfull in handicrafts [mechanics], philosophie, and in sciences conteined in bookes, and is ruler over thirtie six legions.

Vepar
Vepar, alias Separ, a great duke and a strong, he is like a mermaid, he is the guide of the waters, and of ships laden with armour; he bringeth to passe (at the commandement of his master) that the sea shalbe rough and stormie, and shall appeare full of shippes; he killeth men in three daies, with putrifieng their wounds, and producing maggots into them; howbeit, they maie be all healed with diligence, he ruleth nine and twentie legions.

Vine
Vine is a great king and an earle, he showeth himselfe as a lion, riding on a blacke horsse, and carrieth a viper in his hand, he gladlie buildeth large towres, he throweth downe stone walles, and maketh waters rough. At the commandement of the exorcist he answereth of things hidden, of witches, and of things present, past, and to come.

Volac
Valac [Volac] is a great president, and commeth abroad with angels wings like a boie, riding on a twoheaded dragon, he perfectlie answereth of treasure hidden, and where serpents may be seene, which he delivereth into the conjurors hands, void of anie force or strength, and hath dominion over thirtie legions of divels.

Vual
Vuall [Wal] is a great duke and a strong, he is seene as a great and terrible dromedarie, but in humane forme, he soundeth out in a base [deep] voice the Ægyptian toong. This man above all other procureth the especiall love of women, and knoweth things present, past, and to come, procuring the love of freends and foes, he was of the order of potestats, and governeth thirtie seven legions.

Zabalus
also Sabalus [Chatterton]

Zagan
Zagan [Zagam] is a great king and a president, he commeth abroad like a bull, with griphens wings, but when he taketh humane shape, he maketh men wittie, he turneth all mettals into the coine of that dominion, and turneth water into wine, and wine into water, he also turneth bloud into <wine> [oil], & <wine> [oil] into bloud, & a foole into a wise man, he is head of thirtie and three legions.

Zepar
Zepar is a great duke, appearing as a souldier, inflaming women with the loove of men, and when he is bidden he changeth their shape, untill they maie enjoie their beloved, he also maketh them barren, and six and twentie legions are at his obeie and commandement.
Most people in the campaign, including all PCs, can speak Anglo-Norman, which serves as the Common Tongue for the campaign.  Persons of low social standing will tend to have more Anglish grammar and vocabulary, while those of high rank or aspiring to such a position will tend to use more French.

Anglo-Norman is the native tongue of very few people, so almost everybody (including all PCs) speak a second language. For locals to the setting that means either Anglish, French, Cornish or Welsh.  Choosing French as your native tongue probably indicates either that someone in your family (father, uncle, older brother or half-brother) is a Knight (which at this point in history is not yet a hereditary title) or that you are from France. Some folks originating from just off to the northeast of the map may actually speak a local dialect of Danish, as those ratfink Danes controlled a vast chunk of eastern England not that long ago.

Of course, you can play a foreigner type and speak some other tongue.  The Gaelic tongues of the Irish, Scotts and Manx have yet to substantially diverge, so all those guys effectively speak the same tongue.  An exception to this rule is the Pavee Travellers, the Gypsy-like wandering people of Gaelic Irish descent.  Their Pavee tongue is distinctly Gaelic, but has its own constructions as well. The aforementioned Danish will do you for all your stock viking types as well.  Other very interesting options would be Hebrew for a Jewish character or Arabic for a Spanish Moor.  Flemish mercenaries figure in some English armies of the period.  Such characters would probably speak Frisian or Dutch or maybe German or French.  The County of Flanders seems to be a multilingual sort of place.

Latin serves as the Common Tongue for western Christendom, though almost no members of the lower classes speak it.  All magic-users automatically speak Latin and it assumed that their spellbook is written in this tongue unless they are a native Hebrew, Arabic or Greek speaker.  All Clerics of western Christian faith automatically know Latin as well.  Any PC who is not a magic-user or cleric may starts play knowing a smattering of Latin if their Intelligence score is 9 or higher.

>All PCs of Int 4+ are be able to read their native language, with a lower Intelligence score indicating various difficulties such as needing to form the words aloud, slow reading speed, limited vocabulary and/or poor comprehension.  Writing is considered a separate skill and among PCs only magic-user and cleric types have the necessary training.

Many magic-users can read and write (though perhaps not speak) a bewildering array of ancient languages or obscure languages.  For each point of Intelligence above 11, they may select fan additional language.  Below is a d12 chart with some possibilities.  Pick or roll.

1 - Latin
2 - Greek
3 - Hebrew
4 - Pictish Glyphs
5 - Aramaic
6 - Egyptian Hieroglyphics
7 - Norse Runes
8 - Basque
9 - Enochian
10 - Old Irish/Ogham
11 - Persian
12 - Atlantean
St. Algar of Selwood - Anglo-Saxon hermit
St. Dewi - patron saint of Wales, vegetarians, poets
St. Edmund the Martyr - kings, pandemics, torture victims, and wolves
St. Edward the Confessor - Wessex
St. George - England, dragonslayers
St. Aldhelm - Malmesbury, Sherborne, musicians, songwriters
St. Birinus- “Apostles to the West Saxons”, Berkshire, Dorchester, 1st Bishop of Dorchester
St. Cedd - interpreters (brother of St. Chad)
St. Chad - astronomers (brother of St. Cedd)
St. Dubricius
St. Frithuswith - Princess Abbess, patron of Christminster
St. Osmund - insanity; mental illness; mentally ill people; paralysed people; paralysis; ruptures; toothache, Salibury
St. Oswald
St. Petroc - Devon Cornwall, wolves
St. Piran - Cornwall, tin miners 
St. Swithun - weather, Hampshire, Winchester
St. Nicholas of Myra - Children, sailors, fishermen, merchants, the falsely accused, prostitutes, repentant thieves, archers, pawnbrokers, Portsmouth
St. Dismas - thieves, prisoners, undertakers
St. Cuthbert
St. James the Greater - Reading
St. Kenhelm - "there was no place in England to which more pilgrims travelled than to Winchcombe on Cynehelm's feast day (July 17)".
St. Sidwell - virgin girl, patron of Exonbury (sister of St. Juthwara)
St. Urith - virgin girl, Devon
St. Juthwara - virgin girl, Dorset, cheese, carries a sword and her own head  (sister of St. Sidwell)
St. Rumwold - the miraculous infant preacher
St. Julitta - patron saint of Endlestow, Cornwall, rumor that love pledged within site of St. Julitta’s Church is said to always remain true
--------------
St Angus - Strength, War, Courage, Bastards
St. Darwane - dragons, fire, renewal
St. Gregor - Law, Luck, Strength, Passion
St Eberk - Chaos, Weather, Fate, midgets
1139
-- New Moons for 1139 A.D. --
Mon Jan 02 1139 09:50:10 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Tue Jan 31 1139 20:20:13 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Thu Mar 02 1139 05:45:21 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Fri Mar 31 1139 15:42:22 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Apr 30 1139 00:43:53 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon May 29 1139 10:22:49 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Jun 27 1139 21:20:05 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Jul 27 1139 10:18:50 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Aug 26 1139 01:41:13 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Sep 24 1139 19:04:09 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Oct 24 1139 13:16:57 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Nov 23 1139 05:48:31 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Fri Dec 22 1139 21:27:06 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

-- Full Moons for 1139 A.D. --
Mon Jan 16 1139 18:03:52 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Wed Feb 15 1139 12:32:22 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Fri Mar 17 1139 07:17:00 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Apr 15 1139 23:08:55 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon May 15 1139 12:23:43 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Jun 13 1139 22:58:52 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Jul 13 1139 07:36:57 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Aug 11 1139 15:28:04 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Sep 09 1139 23:40:52 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Oct 09 1139 09:00:52 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Nov 07 1139 18:48:59 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Thu Dec 07 1139 07:14:16 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

1140
-- New Moons for 1140 A.D. --
Sun Jan 21 1140 10:44:55 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Mon Feb 19 1140 21:53:08 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Wed Mar 20 1140 08:19:46 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Apr 18 1140 16:33:13 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat May 18 1140 00:06:09 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Jun 16 1140 07:49:49 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Jul 15 1140 16:56:07 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Aug 14 1140 04:35:50 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Sep 12 1140 19:23:52 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Oct 12 1140 12:56:47 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Nov 11 1140 06:59:24 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Wed Dec 11 1140 01:55:14 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

-- Full Moons for 1140 A.D. --
Fri Jan 05 1140 21:23:13 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sun Feb 04 1140 13:12:23 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Tue Mar 05 1140 06:13:03 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Thu Apr 04 1140 00:25:13 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri May 03 1140 16:35:44 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Jun 02 1140 06:51:17 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Jul 01 1140 19:02:26 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Jul 31 1140 05:40:54 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Aug 29 1140 15:34:14 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Sep 28 1140 01:19:56 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Oct 27 1140 11:18:07 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Nov 25 1140 20:42:33 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Wed Dec 25 1140 07:52:44 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

1141
-- New Moons for 1141 A.D. --
Thu Jan 09 1141 19:20:17 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sat Feb 08 1141 10:21:31 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sun Mar 09 1141 23:39:29 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Apr 08 1141 09:22:55 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed May 07 1141 17:05:34 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Jun 05 1141 23:44:29 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Jul 05 1141 06:33:17 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Aug 03 1141 14:47:45 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Sep 02 1141 01:28:12 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Oct 01 1141 15:05:43 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Oct 31 1141 07:35:18 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Nov 30 1141 01:14:27 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Mon Dec 29 1141 20:47:14 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

-- Full Moons for 1141 A.D. --
Thu Jan 23 1141 20:11:58 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sat Feb 22 1141 09:51:56 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Mon Mar 24 1141 01:40:50 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Apr 22 1141 17:05:40 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu May 22 1141 08:28:21 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Jun 20 1141 23:20:56 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Jul 20 1141 13:29:05 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Aug 19 1141 02:45:54 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Sep 17 1141 15:07:18 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Oct 17 1141 02:35:05 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Nov 15 1141 12:22:45 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sun Dec 14 1141 22:54:22 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

1142
-- New Moons for 1142 A.D. --
Wed Jan 28 1142 15:37:21 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Fri Feb 27 1142 08:13:02 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sat Mar 28 1142 22:38:04 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Apr 27 1142 08:51:53 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue May 26 1142 16:45:53 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Jun 24 1142 23:37:11 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Jul 24 1142 06:38:26 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Aug 22 1142 14:43:24 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Sep 21 1142 00:32:20 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Oct 20 1142 12:41:09 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Nov 19 1142 02:35:30 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Fri Dec 18 1142 20:08:02 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

-- Full Moons for 1142 A.D. --
Tue Jan 13 1142 09:34:26 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Wed Feb 11 1142 20:37:07 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Fri Mar 13 1142 09:07:25 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Apr 11 1142 21:11:16 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon May 11 1142 10:03:33 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Jun 10 1142 00:01:37 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Jul 09 1142 15:07:07 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Aug 08 1142 06:52:59 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Sep 06 1142 22:30:29 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Oct 06 1142 13:13:29 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Nov 05 1142 01:40:52 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Fri Dec 04 1142 13:58:38 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

1143
-- New Moons for 1143 A.D. --
Sun Jan 17 1143 15:19:33 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Tue Feb 16 1143 10:27:00 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Thu Mar 18 1143 04:43:15 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Apr 16 1143 19:03:02 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun May 16 1143 06:25:16 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Jun 14 1143 15:37:56 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Jul 13 1143 23:43:15 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Aug 12 1143 07:32:00 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Sep 10 1143 15:43:16 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Oct 10 1143 00:58:04 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Nov 08 1143 11:03:29 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Wed Dec 08 1143 00:35:39 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

-- Full Moons for 1143 A.D. --
Sun Jan 03 1143 01:22:52 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Mon Feb 01 1143 12:01:47 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Tue Mar 02 1143 21:56:41 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Thu Apr 01 1143 08:19:16 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Apr 30 1143 17:47:23 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun May 30 1143 04:19:10 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Jun 28 1143 16:45:48 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Jul 28 1143 07:22:51 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Aug 26 1143 23:41:58 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Sep 25 1143 16:46:58 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Oct 25 1143 09:39:25 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Nov 24 1143 00:34:16 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Thu Dec 23 1143 15:00:38 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

1144
-- New Moons for 1144 A.D. --
Thu Jan 06 1144 16:33:54 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sat Feb 05 1144 10:09:40 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Mon Mar 06 1144 04:03:48 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Tue Apr 04 1144 21:59:16 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu May 04 1144 13:07:42 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Jun 03 1144 02:14:52 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Jul 02 1144 13:30:29 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Jul 31 1144 23:17:44 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Aug 30 1144 08:10:57 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Sep 28 1144 16:56:12 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Oct 28 1144 02:24:10 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Nov 26 1144 12:14:30 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Tue Dec 26 1144 00:42:02 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

-- Full Moons for 1144 A.D. --
Sat Jan 22 1144 03:37:23 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sun Feb 20 1144 14:15:21 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Tue Mar 21 1144 00:07:56 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Apr 19 1144 07:57:02 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu May 18 1144 15:46:03 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Jun 17 1144 00:41:31 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Jul 16 1144 11:34:51 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Aug 15 1144 00:53:03 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Sep 13 1144 16:36:32 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Oct 13 1144 10:17:42 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Nov 12 1144 03:58:41 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Mon Dec 11 1144 22:17:00 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

1145
-- New Moons for 1145 A.D. --
Wed Jan 24 1145 14:36:39 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Fri Feb 23 1145 05:34:58 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sat Mar 24 1145 22:12:52 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Apr 23 1145 14:06:06 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed May 23 1145 05:43:34 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Jun 21 1145 20:26:36 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Jul 21 1145 09:42:39 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Aug 19 1145 21:25:08 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Sep 18 1145 08:01:08 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Oct 17 1145 18:16:23 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Nov 16 1145 03:47:55 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sat Dec 15 1145 14:47:03 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

-- Full Moons for 1145 A.D. --
Wed Jan 10 1145 14:46:32 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Fri Feb 09 1145 04:28:24 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sat Mar 10 1145 15:14:24 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Mon Apr 09 1145 00:44:55 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue May 08 1145 08:04:31 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Jun 06 1145 15:15:05 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Jul 05 1145 23:06:32 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Aug 04 1145 08:25:37 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Sep 02 1145 20:03:04 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Oct 02 1145 10:40:03 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Nov 01 1145 04:17:12 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Nov 30 1145 22:52:21 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sun Dec 30 1145 18:32:41 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

1146
-- New Moons for 1146 A.D. --
Mon Jan 14 1146 02:06:48 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Tue Feb 12 1146 13:44:05 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Thu Mar 14 1146 02:55:06 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Apr 12 1146 16:05:58 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun May 12 1146 06:28:23 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Jun 10 1146 21:42:48 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Jul 10 1146 13:05:55 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Aug 09 1146 03:56:21 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Sep 07 1146 17:55:27 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Oct 07 1146 07:06:58 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Nov 05 1146 18:39:23 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Thu Dec 05 1146 06:31:07 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

-- Full Moons for 1146 A.D. --
Tue Jan 29 1146 12:20:58 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Thu Feb 28 1146 03:05:30 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Fri Mar 29 1146 15:41:27 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Apr 28 1146 00:52:14 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon May 27 1146 08:34:09 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Jun 25 1146 15:35:27 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Jul 24 1146 22:42:06 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Aug 23 1146 06:53:10 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Sep 21 1146 17:19:16 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Oct 21 1146 06:55:02 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Nov 19 1146 22:44:07 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Thu Dec 19 1146 17:46:00 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

1147
-- New Moons for 1147 A.D. --
Fri Jan 03 1147 17:33:36 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sun Feb 02 1147 03:47:28 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Mon Mar 03 1147 13:36:08 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Wed Apr 02 1147 00:40:33 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu May 01 1147 11:41:28 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat May 31 1147 00:03:11 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Jun 29 1147 13:50:14 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Jul 29 1147 04:53:12 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Aug 27 1147 20:52:51 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Sep 26 1147 13:17:44 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Oct 26 1147 05:22:25 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Nov 24 1147 19:16:30 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Wed Dec 24 1147 08:23:36 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

-- Full Moons for 1147 A.D. --
Sat Jan 18 1147 13:17:34 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Mon Feb 17 1147 07:34:59 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Wed Mar 19 1147 00:29:10 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Apr 17 1147 13:35:54 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat May 17 1147 00:06:08 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Jun 15 1147 08:32:55 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Jul 14 1147 15:45:45 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Aug 12 1147 22:48:45 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Sep 11 1147 06:52:46 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Oct 10 1147 16:58:36 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Nov 09 1147 04:39:08 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Mon Dec 08 1147 19:51:25 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

1148
-- New Moons for 1148 A.D. --
Thu Jan 22 1148 19:37:40 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sat Feb 21 1148 05:22:35 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sun Mar 21 1148 15:17:17 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Apr 19 1148 23:59:32 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed May 19 1148 09:03:15 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Jun 17 1148 19:06:53 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Jul 17 1148 06:56:17 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Aug 15 1148 21:09:01 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Sep 14 1148 13:46:50 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Oct 14 1148 07:59:07 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Nov 13 1148 01:16:20 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sun Dec 12 1148 18:08:08 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

-- Full Moons for 1148 A.D. --
Wed Jan 07 1148 13:00:57 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Fri Feb 06 1148 07:11:28 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sun Mar 07 1148 01:15:06 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Mon Apr 05 1148 19:01:53 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed May 05 1148 09:34:58 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Jun 03 1148 21:29:37 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Jul 03 1148 07:05:39 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Aug 01 1148 15:21:02 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Aug 30 1148 23:27:13 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Sep 29 1148 08:21:01 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Oct 28 1148 18:32:07 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Nov 27 1148 05:10:53 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sun Dec 26 1148 18:22:46 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

1149
-- New Moons for 1149 A.D. --
Tue Jan 11 1149 08:40:43 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Wed Feb 09 1149 20:47:36 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Fri Mar 11 1149 06:53:31 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sat Apr 09 1149 16:30:24 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon May 09 1149 00:09:36 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Jun 07 1149 07:33:01 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Jul 06 1149 15:44:13 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Aug 05 1149 01:59:14 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Sep 03 1149 15:15:29 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Oct 03 1149 07:39:30 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Nov 02 1149 02:17:35 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Dec 01 1149 20:36:40 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sat Dec 31 1149 15:00:18 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

-- Full Moons for 1149 A.D. --
Tue Jan 25 1149 09:11:26 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Thu Feb 24 1149 01:25:28 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Fri Mar 25 1149 19:24:40 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Apr 24 1149 12:03:31 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue May 24 1149 03:17:25 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Jun 22 1149 16:33:41 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Jul 22 1149 04:03:47 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Aug 20 1149 14:28:26 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Sep 19 1149 00:29:41 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Oct 18 1149 10:33:03 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Nov 16 1149 19:50:49 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Fri Dec 16 1149 06:36:25 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

1150
-- New Moons for 1150 A.D. --
Mon Jan 30 1150 07:17:43 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Tue Feb 28 1150 20:53:37 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Thu Mar 30 1150 08:45:18 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Apr 28 1150 17:16:25 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun May 28 1150 00:14:24 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Jun 26 1150 06:46:43 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Jul 25 1150 14:10:26 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Aug 23 1150 23:35:21 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Sep 22 1150 11:47:33 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Oct 22 1150 02:59:04 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Nov 20 1150 19:44:19 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Wed Dec 20 1150 15:01:51 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

-- Full Moons for 1150 A.D. --
Sat Jan 14 1150 18:11:33 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Mon Feb 13 1150 06:56:37 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Tue Mar 14 1150 21:55:48 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Apr 13 1150 12:49:54 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat May 13 1150 04:05:45 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Jun 11 1150 19:12:10 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Jul 11 1150 09:49:11 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Aug 09 1150 23:45:29 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Sep 08 1150 12:52:22 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Oct 08 1150 01:03:42 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Nov 06 1150 11:22:41 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Tue Dec 05 1150 22:06:02 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

1151
-- New Moons for 1151 A.D. --
Fri Jan 19 1151 10:23:03 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sun Feb 18 1151 04:11:01 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Mon Mar 19 1151 20:09:54 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Apr 18 1151 07:51:35 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu May 17 1151 16:44:39 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Jun 15 1151 23:57:57 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Jul 15 1151 06:49:41 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Aug 13 1151 14:23:07 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Sep 11 1151 23:22:41 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Oct 11 1151 10:23:50 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Nov 09 1151 22:56:52 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sun Dec 09 1151 15:12:24 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

-- Full Moons for 1151 A.D. --
Thu Jan 04 1151 08:38:20 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Fri Feb 02 1151 19:19:53 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sun Mar 04 1151 06:21:29 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Mon Apr 02 1151 18:49:58 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed May 02 1151 06:59:10 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu May 31 1151 20:10:52 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Jun 30 1151 10:40:07 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Jul 30 1151 02:16:14 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Aug 28 1151 18:17:58 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Sep 27 1151 09:50:54 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Oct 27 1151 00:14:37 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Nov 25 1151 12:18:04 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Tue Dec 25 1151 00:12:13 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

1152
-- New Moons for 1152 A.D. --
Tue Jan 08 1152 09:38:23 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Thu Feb 07 1152 04:52:23 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Fri Mar 07 1152 23:06:24 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sun Apr 06 1152 15:52:01 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue May 06 1152 04:37:05 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Jun 04 1152 14:48:53 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Jul 03 1152 23:26:17 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Aug 02 1152 07:26:37 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Aug 31 1152 15:32:17 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Sep 30 1152 00:19:48 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Oct 29 1152 10:31:18 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Nov 27 1152 21:48:47 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sat Dec 27 1152 12:31:14 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

-- Full Moons for 1152 A.D. --
Wed Jan 23 1152 11:10:29 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Thu Feb 21 1152 21:17:41 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sat Mar 22 1152 07:40:16 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Apr 20 1152 16:44:39 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue May 20 1152 02:23:42 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Jun 18 1152 13:38:49 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Jul 18 1152 03:08:33 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Aug 16 1152 18:47:20 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Sep 15 1152 11:49:03 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Oct 15 1152 05:10:18 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Nov 13 1152 20:53:42 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sat Dec 13 1152 12:17:31 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

1153
-- New Moons for 1153 A.D. --
Mon Jan 26 1153 05:14:47 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Tue Feb 24 1153 22:55:10 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Thu Mar 26 1153 17:14:32 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Apr 25 1153 09:11:51 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun May 24 1153 23:18:17 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Jun 23 1153 11:32:59 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Jul 22 1153 22:11:32 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Aug 21 1153 07:40:12 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Sep 19 1153 16:36:59 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Oct 19 1153 01:49:12 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Nov 17 1153 11:01:30 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Wed Dec 16 1153 22:39:53 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

-- Full Moons for 1153 A.D. --
Mon Jan 12 1153 01:53:50 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Tue Feb 10 1153 13:26:50 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Wed Mar 11 1153 23:59:42 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Apr 10 1153 08:02:41 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat May 09 1153 15:32:30 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Jun 07 1153 23:38:24 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Jul 07 1153 09:22:35 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Aug 05 1153 21:26:03 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Sep 04 1153 12:03:09 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Oct 04 1153 04:59:50 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Nov 02 1153 22:31:03 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Wed Dec 02 1153 17:21:40 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

1154
-- New Moons for 1154 A.D. --
Fri Jan 15 1154 11:45:02 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sun Feb 14 1154 01:59:28 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Mon Mar 15 1154 18:02:22 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Wed Apr 14 1154 09:34:56 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri May 14 1154 01:14:48 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Jun 12 1154 16:28:53 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Jul 12 1154 06:39:01 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Aug 10 1154 19:21:09 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Sep 09 1154 06:42:22 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Oct 08 1154 17:18:22 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Nov 07 1154 02:50:35 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Mon Dec 06 1154 13:41:31 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)

-- Full Moons for 1154 A.D. --
Fri Jan 01 1154 11:00:58 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Sun Jan 31 1154 02:11:07 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Mon Mar 01 1154 14:17:53 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Wed Mar 31 1154 00:41:24 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Apr 29 1154 08:20:23 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri May 28 1154 15:22:32 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sat Jun 26 1154 22:44:35 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Mon Jul 26 1154 07:13:34 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Tue Aug 24 1154 17:38:10 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Thu Sep 23 1154 06:46:49 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Fri Oct 22 1154 23:03:15 GMT-0500 (Central Daylight Time)
Sun Nov 21 1154 16:56:04 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
Tue Dec 21 1154 12:52:13 GMT-0600 (Central Standard Time)
The blade properly called Caudimordax is oft referred to in common lays as Tailbiter, and sometimes styled The Sword That Would Not Be Sheathed. The earliest report of Tailbiter puts it in the hands of the ancient hero Bellomarius, a well-known slayer of dragons. Bellomarius eventually became king by his own hand. The last of the Bellomarian dynasty, Augustus Bonifacius, gave the sword as a gift to the adventurer Aegidius in reward for driving a troublesome giant out of the realm. Aegidius famously used Caudimordax to subdue the dragon Chrysophylax, afterward looting the wyrm's lair. When Bonifacius died without an heir Aegidius assumed the throne, taking the royal name Draconarius. The reign of King Draconarius is remembered as long and mostly peaceful, and most later depictions of Aegidius Draconarius show him as a smiling elder with a long white beard, his magic blade upraised in justice rather than anger, with a cowering dragon at his feet.

Like most haunted blades the tale-tellings conflict as to the magic the sword holds. The most well-known property of Caudimordax is its eagerness to fight dragons. All the lays report that when a dragon is to be found within five miles of Caudimordax the sword leaps from its scabbard and into the hands of its owner. Only the greatest of strength can force the blade back into its sheath and every utmost effort must be maintained to keep it there.
----
Morglaien a.k.a. Morglay- mentioned in Chatterton, sword of Tristan? - in possession of Robert of Glowan
----
Enilno, the Quicksword, the Sword of Santre, allows for double attacks the first of which always wins initiative
----
Sword of Goliath, made by one of the angels who sired the Nephilim?  oversized and overweight -1 to-hit for every point of Str below 18, given to King David by the High Priest Eli, double dice for damage, bronze or bronzish
----
Nothung/Balmung/Gram, the Sword of Wrath, the Shattered Sword
----
Mimung, forged by the legendary smith Wayland, the Sword of Waldere, the Sword of Thidrek
----
Chrysaor, the Sword of Justice, the Sword of Artegal, used by Zeus in fighting the titans, a golden blade of admanant alloy, can cleave through anything, wrecks shield or armor
----
Almace, sword of the Bishop Turpin, possibly another blade by Wayland, less potent than Mimung
----
Caladbolg - makes a circle like an arc of rainbow when swung, and has the power to slice the tops off hills and slaughter an entire host, appears in both Welsh and Irish legends
----
White-Hilt, the Sword of Rhydderch Hael or Riderch the Generous, flame tongue sword
----
Clarent, the Sword of Peace, used by Arthur for knightings and other ceremonies, stolen by Mordred

Non-swords of Note

Rhongomyniad or Rhomgomiant - the Spear of Kings
Carnwennan, Little White-Hilt, dagger which once slew a giant and cut a Black Witch in twain
pro-Maud
Empress Maud (MU7)
>born Feb 2, 1102
>daughter of King Henry
>Widow-Empress of the Holy Roman Empire
>Queen of the Romans
>wife of Geoffrey of Anjou
>mother of Curtmantle FitzEmpress, Geoffrey FitzEmpress & William FitzEmpress

Geoffrey of Anjou (F8)
>b. 24 Aug 1113
>called ‘the Handsome’

Curtmantle FitzEmpress (NM at campaign start)
>b 5 March 1133

Geoffrey FitzEmpress (NM at campaign start)
>b 1 June 1134

William FitzEmpress (NM at campaign start)
>b 22 July 1136

Robert Rufus (F10)
>born sometime before 1100
>a.k.a. Robert de Caen
>Earl of Glowan [Gloucester]
>illegitimate half-brother of Maude
>Maude's most loyal and capable supporter

David of Scotland (F9)
>born circa 1084
>King of the Scots since 1124
>dies of natural causes May 24, 1153
>uncle of Empress Maude

Ranulf de Gernon (F8)
>b 1099
>Earl of Chester
>lost most of his lands in the concessions to David
>captured Lincoln Castle in 1141
>switches over to pro-Stephen in late 1145 or early 1146

William de Mohun of Dunster (F7) 
>b. 1090    d.c. 1155
>was a favourite of Empress Matilda and a loyal supporter of her in the war against King Stephen, during which he earned the epithet of the "Scourge of the West". Empress Matilda conferred upon him the title Earl of Somerset, in 1141. In the foundation charter of the priory at Bruton he describes himself as "Willielmus de Moyne, comes Somersetensis". Unlike Baldwin de Redvers who was created Earl of Devon by Matilda at around the same time, William's title was not recognised by Stephen or Henry II, Matilda's son, and his descendants did not use the title.
William was the son of William de Moion, (seigneur of Moyon and Sheriff of Somerset in 1086. William is mentioned in the Domesday Book where he is shown to control a large number of manors in Somerset centred on Dunster Castle.[2] Manors he controlled included Minehead, West Quantoxhead and Combe Sydenham.[3]) who was seigneur of Moyon which is close to Saint-Lô. the elder William was sheriff of Somerset in 1084.
>During the war between Matilda and Stephen, Stephen marched against Mohun's castle at Dunster, but finding it too hard to take, he left Henry de Tracy to keep Mohun under siege.
William married Agnes de Gaunt, daughter of Walter de Gaunt and Maud of Brittany, daughter of Stephen I, Count of Brittany.[1]

pro-Stephen
Stephen of Blois (F10)
>b 1096
>Count of Mortain
>wields a long axe at Lincoln, also favors sword & spiked shield

Matilda of Boulogne (Cl6)
>1105 - May 3, 1152
>Countess of Boulogne
>Stephen’s wife
>3 sons: Eustace (1130), Baldwin (died before 1135), William (born 1137)
>2 daughters: Matilda, Marie (born 1136)

Henry of Blois (MU10)
>b. 1101
>Abbot of Glastonbury and Bishop of Wintoncester (Winchester)
>brother of Stephen
>obtained a Papal Legate on March 1, 1139 (-Sept 23, 1143)
>temporarily switched sides in 1141
>possibly the wealthiest man in England
>During his lifetime he was occasionally referred to as a king without a throne, and the power behind the throne.
>great patron of architecture, ancient sculpture and literature

William de Corbeil
>born 1070    
>Archbishop of Canterbury, 1123-1136
>Crowned Stephen despite his oath to Henry
>Some chroniclers considered him a perjurer and a traitor for crowning Stephen, none doubted his piety

Theobald de Bec (Cl13)
>born c. 1090
>Archbishop of Canterbury, 1138-1161

Thurstan of Bayeux (Cl11)
>born c. 1070
>Archbishop of York
>opponent of Canterbury’s claims to primacy
>organized forces in the Battle of the Standard, created the Standard
>negotiated the Truce at Roxburgh between Stephen and David, 1138
>supporter of Christina of Markyate
>a sincere reformer, and opposed to the election of unfit men to the episocpacy
>resigned his post January 21, 1140 to become a Clunaic monk
>dies shortly thereafter on Feb 6, 1140

William le Gros (F9)
>Count of Aumale
>distinguished himself at the Battle of the Standard, 
>made Earl of Yorkshire as a result
>with Stephen at his defeat at Lincoln

William of Ypres (F8)
>born c1090
>Stephen’s chief lieutenant
>banished pretender to the title Count of Flanders
>commanded a contingent of Flemish soldiers

Robert Le Bossu (F7)
>b 1104
>hunchback
>otherwise identical twin brother of Waleran, Son of Robert
>their father, Robert de Beaumont, revered as one of the wisest men of his age
>enemy of Robert Rufus 
>a nominal supporter of the king, there seems to have been little contact between him and Stephen
>fought a private war 1141-1149 against Ranulf de Gernon
>When Earl Robert of Gloucester died in 1147, Robert of Leicester led the movement among the greater earls of England to negotiate private treaties to establish peace in their areas, a process hastened by the Empress's departure to Normandy, and complete by 1149.
>man of letters

Waleran, son of Robert (F7)
>Count of Meulan
>b 1104
>identical twin of Robert Le Busso, save for the latter’s hump
>their father, Robert de Beaumont, revered as one of the wisest men of his age
>Easter 1136 betrothed to the king's infant daughter, Mathilda, and later received the city and county of Worcester as her marriage portion.
>September 1136 made Lieutenant of Normandy, commanded forces repelling the pro-Maude invasion led by Roger de Toeni
>He and his family began to monopolise favour and patronage at Stephen's court and they alienated the faction headed by Earl Robert of Gloucester, who in retaliation adopted the cause of his half-sister, the Empress. In June 1138, Waleran was in Normandy to confront successfully again an invading Angevin army. Waleran used his extensive connections at the French court to mobilise a large force of French knights to assist him. It was probably in 1138 that he received the second title of Earl of Worcester.
>Before Easter 1139 Waleran was in Paris on an embassy to his cousin, the new King Louis VII of France. On his return he was the motivating force behind the overthrow of the court faction headed by the justiciar, Bishop Roger of Salisbury. The bishop and his family were arrested in June, and their wealth and many of their possessions confiscated.
>One of the first attacks Gloucester sponsored was an assault on Waleran's English base at Worcester. The city was attacked and sacked on 7 November 1139.
>Waleran was present at the Battle of Lincoln in 1141. He was one of the royalist earls who fled when they saw that the battle was lost. Waleran escaped, but the king was captured and imprisoned at Bristol. Waleran fought on for several months, probably basing himself at Worcester, where he had to deal with the defection of his sheriff, William de Beauchamp. It may have been at this time that he seized and fortified the Herefordshire Beacon for the bishop of Hereford complained of his lordship of this castle in 1148. At last late in the summer of 1141 Waleran gave up the struggle as news reached him that his Norman lands were being taken over by the invading Angevin army. He surrendered to the Empress Mathilda, and had to accept her appropriation of the abbey of Bordesley as it had been founded on a royal estate. However, once in Normandy, Waleran was accepted at the court of Geoffrey of Anjou, and his lands in England and Normandy were confirmed to him. His first marriage, to the king's daughter Mathilda, had ended with the child's death in London in 1137. Around the end of 1142, Waleran married Agnes, daughter of Amaury de Montfort, count of Évreux. As a result of the marriage he obtained estates in the Pays de Caux and the lordship of Gournay-sur-Marne in the Ile de France. Waleran had already obtained his mother's marriage portion of the honor of Elbeuf on the Seine on her death in or around 1139. Despite the political reverses on 1141, Waleran was considerably wealthier at the end of the year than he had been at the beginning.
>Waleran served with Geoffrey of Anjou at the siege of Rouen in 1143/4. During it he captured and burnt the suburb of Emendreville and the Church of St. Sever, where many of both sexes perished in the flames. He consolidated his position as leader of the Norman nobility by a formal treaty with his cousin Robert du Neubourg, seneschal of Normandy. However, Waleran seems to have turned his mind to the French court at this time. In Easter 1146 he was at Vézelay for the preaching of the Second Crusade and attended the great assembly of magnates at Paris from April to June 1147 to meet the pope and Louis VII. On 29 June he was joint leader of the Anglo-Norman crusaders on their rendezvous with Louis VII at Worms. He accompanied the crusade to Syria and its unfortunate conclusion before Damascus. He seems to have left Palestine before King Louis, taking the sea voyage home. He was shipwrecked somewhere on his return, perhaps on the coast of Provence. He promised to build an abbey of Cistercians if he survived the wreck, and in due course he built the abbey of St Mary de Voto (of the Vow) or Le Valasse in fulfilment of his vow.
>literary patron and man of letters, chruch patron

Alan the Black (F9)
>born before 1100, died September 15, 1146
>Earl of Cornwall and Earl of Richmond
>deprived of Cornwall by Ranulph de Gernon following the Battle of Lincoln

William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Lincoln and 1st Earl of Arundel


others
William Adelin (spectre)
>the Drowned Prince
>died in the White Ship disaster of 1120 at age 17
>obviously now a ghost on a ghost ship

Alberic of Ostia (Cl14)
>Cardinal
>made Papal Legate to negotiate a peace between David and Stephen 

Christina of Marykate (Cl10)
>mystic nun in Bedfordshire

William fitz Duncan (F8)
>Mormaer of Moray
>lieutenant of King David
>victorious leader at the Battle of Clitheroe

Roger of Salisbury (Cl11)
>Bishop at Sarum Cathedral
>d. 1139
>built the second Castle Devizes, “the most splendid castle in Christendom”
>nephews the Nigel, Bishop of Ely and Adelem, Bishop of Lincoln
>ostensibly pro-Stephen, but his activity during the Investiture Controversy demonstrated he was a man adept at playing both sides
>created the exchequer system under Henry
>He and his nephews seem to have secured a number of castles outside their own dioceses, and the old bishop behaved as if he were an equal of the King. At a council held in June of 1139, Stephen found a pretext for demanding a surrender of their castles, and on their refusal they were arrested.[4] After a short struggle all Roger's great castles were sequestrated. But Henry of Winchester demanded the restoration of the bishop.
>The King was considered to have committed an almost unpardonable crime in offering violence to members of the church, in defiance of the scriptural command, "Touch not mine anointed." Stephen took up a defiant attitude, and the question remained unsettled. This quarrel with the church, which immediately preceded the landing of the Empress, had a serious effect on Stephen's fortunes. The moment that the fortune of war declared against him, the clergy acknowledged Matilda.

Roger le Poer (Cl10)
>Roger of Salisbury’s son
>Lord Chancellor under Stephen, 1135-1139
Serpent Stone of St. Hilda - appears as an iridescent stone carved in the shape of a snake with its tail/body curled into a tight spiral - remove poison 1/day, serpents (but not dragons) save vs spells or flee in terror 1/day - a glimpse of it enrages the Children of Ammon (both the Biblical tribe and the prehistoric squid)

Griffon’s Egg - pokeball containing the last known griffon

Hand of Justice (Hand of St. James the Just) - ?

Goblet of the Griffon’s Claw - wine drank from it cures serious wounds 1/day, cures disease 1/week

Lantern of Cartaphilus - light 3/day, detect good 3/day

Cloak of Simon - fly 1/day, levitate 3/day

Ring of Gyges - ring of invisibility

Goik Shard - half-blackened, fist-sized chunk of rock, lightning bolt 1/day (6d6 damage), but user must roll Int or less on d12 to avoid holding it backwards
Adiriron
Dapdapiron
Xyzzy - for teleportation
Cei-u - for summoning djinns of lightning
Sim Sim Sala Bim - levitation
hax pax max Deus adimax
Ochus Bochus
Sword, Long - 2 basic varieties, the old fashioned spathic type and the new model knightly sword

Sword, Short - the old seax, the even older gladius and the new-fangled anlace

Axe, Long - 2-handed, up to 6’ haft, assymetrical “bearded” blade

Spear/Lance - no distinction between spear and lance

Winged Spear - a.k.a. Boar Spear, with proper training useful for parrying

Knife - basically a smaller seax

Club - with round shield a common dueling weapon

Glaive - typically around 8’ of haft

Hand Axe - the Frankish design (Francisca) is well balanced for throwing

Fussart - glaivelike weapon with only 3 or 4 feet of haft

Mace - ball or star, typically of bronze, about 2” in diameter, no flanged maces yet

Crossbow - light xbow only, very common compared to bows, Flemish mercenaries considered the best xbowmen in the realm

Bow - the bowmen of Wales and North England are considered superior in the craft
This list was copied from a posting on the Usenet newsgroup soc.history.medieval by William Addams Reitwiesner. He explained the derivation of the list:
The list of persons actually known to have been at the Battle of Hastings on the side of William the Conqueror is printed in the second edition of Cokayne's Complete Peerage, vol XII, Part I, Appendix pp. 47-48, as part of Appendix L. Numbers 1-12 are recorded by William of Poitiers, number 13 is portrayed in a battle scene in the Bayeux Tapestry, and 14 and 15 are named by Orderic. 16-19 were in William's army and almost certainly at the battle (16 named by William of Poitiers, 17-19 portrayed in the Bayeux Tapestry), but there is no direct statement that they actually were at the Battle of Hastings. Number 20 is stated by Orderic to have taken part in fights in the English war before William became King. 



Here's the list as it was posted:
Robert de Beaumont, afterwards Count of Meulan and Earl of Leicester
Eustace, Count of Boulogne
William, afterwards 3rd Count of Evreux
Geoffrey of Mortagne, afterwards Count of Perche
William FitzOsbern, afterwards Earl of Hereford
Aimery, vicomte of Thouars
Hugh de Montfort, seigneur of Montfort-sur-Risle
Walter Giffard, seigneur of Longueville
Ralph de Toeni, seigneur of Conches
Hugh de Grandmesnil, seigneur of Grandmesnil
William de Warenne, afterwards Earl of Surrey
William Malet, seigneur of Graville
Eudes, Bishop of Bayeux, afterwards Earl of Kent
Turstin FitzRou - three sons Turstin (no known descendants, Eustace de Whitney, Richard de Rollos

[Turstin the Fleming was born about 1045 in France.1 He was the son of Rolf.1 Turstin the Fleming was also known as Tourstain fitz Rou le Blanc. He is called "Turstin the Fleming" in a much later document. The conjecture, albeit not proved, is that he is one and the same as "Turstin fitz Rou" who carried the papal banner during the battle of Hastings. I agree with this conjecture, however, more research needs to be done, and positive proof may never be found given the antiquity of the issue. Before the Battle of Hastings, Duke William of Normandy had received a banner from the Pope. He asked Raoul de Conches and Walter Giffard to bear the standard into battle beside him, but both declined, possibly because of the grave danger. Torstin however, took up the banner and throughout the day, rode beside the Duke.1 Before 1086 Turstin married Agnes, daughter of Alfred of Marlborough.1 Turstin the Fleming died after 1086.1]

Engenulf de Laigle, seigneur of Laigle
Geoffrey de Mowbray, Bishop of Coutances
Robert, Count of Mortain, afterwards Earl of Cornwall
Wadard [believed to be a follower of the Bishop of Bayeux]

[the first record of the name Woodward was found in Essex where Commander Wadard was granted lands (Domesday Book-1086) by King William for his assistance at the Battle of Hastings. The first recorded scion of the family, (Falaise Roll. p.112), Commander Wadard assembled King William's army at Saint Valery in Normandy for the invasion of England. It was he, Wadard, who advised King William of the Saxon King Harold's approach from the north at Hastings. His descendents, Henry and Simon Wadard, were still Lords of their respective Manors in Essex in 1278.]

Vital [believed to be a follower of the Bishop of Bayeux]
Goubert d'Auffay, seigneur of Auffay
The Northern Magnates (i.e. major holdings north of campaign map)

anti-Stephen
William de Roumare, Earl of Lincolnshire
William de Beauchamp
Roger fitzMiles
Miles of Glowan [Gloucester]
Robert of Glowan [Gloucester]

pro-Stephen
William Peverel
Robert de Ferrers, Earl of Derby & Nottinghamshire
Robert Marmion
Robert de Beaumont, Earl of Leicestershire & Hereford
Waleran de Beaumont, Earl of Worcestershire & Count of Meulan
Roger “le Poer” Beaumont, Earl of Warwick
Simon de St. Liz (Beaumont ally)
Gilbert fitzRichard (of Clare), Earl of Hertfordshire 
A Peasant's Year
January - Christmas (12/25 is the first day of Xmas), recover from Christmas

February - indoors: repair hunting nets, fashion leather harnesses, sharpen knives & axes, fit handles to scythes & sickles, mak reed mats & baskets, carve spoons platters & bowls, spin flax & wool to make new clothes; outdoors on milder days: gather firewood, prune vines, mend fences, feed livestock

March - planting: one field planted with barley oats or millet, one left fallow for sheep and cattle, one already planted in autumn with rye or wheat, new lambs born

April - clean ditches, repair stream banks, mend fences, prune trees, haul timber, fix sheds (wattle and daub walls, thatched roof), new lambs born

May - new lambs washed & sheared, bee-keeping

June - new lambs washed & sheared, mowing the hay

July - harvest the rye & wheat, sheaves left out to dry, gardening (leeks, onions, peas, beans), salt-mining & boiling

August - threshing of the sheaves

September - orchard picking (apples, cherries, plums, pears), grapes picked for winery, firewood gathered, fox deer & hare hunted

October - grain taken to mill for winter, gathering of nuts roots herbs berries mushrooms, fallow plot plowed & sown with winter wheat or rye, privies cleaned, sheepfolds repaired, fences mended, firewood gathered, fox deer & hare hunted

November - firewood gathered split & stacked, pigs & oxen slaughtered smoked/salted/dried for winter use, willow twigs & reeds gathered for basket & mat weeving, rushes gathered for wicks for candlemaking, flax & hemp processed to make rope

December - orchard trees trimmed, grape vines pruned & staked, clay banks of mill pond rebuilt, boar hunted
a B/X D&D campaign set in 12th century southwest England, sorta
WessexCompanion
English medieval towns were very small by modern standards. Only London with a population of about 35,000 by 1300 was a large city. England's second city, Norwich grew from about 6,000 inhabitants in 1086 to about 10,000 in 1300.

http://history.wisc.edu/sommerville/123/123%2013%20Society.htm

There were a small number Jews in English towns (London, York, Oxford, Lincoln, Leicester and Winchester.) Most practiced as bankers or money-lenders:  Aaron of Lincoln, one ironic example, loaned money to finance building monasteries and cathedrals.


dieroll city/town village hamlet 
1 - 1,500 - 600 - 100 
2 - 2,500 - 600 - 100 
3 - 3,500 - 700 - 200 
4 - 4,500 - 700 - 200 
5 - 5,500 - 800 - 300 
6 - 6,500 - 900 - 400 
Herein is detailed an incomplete listing of the items and fuctions that may be found as treasure within those times threatened by the evil of Minax.

Ankhs - The Key to Access Spaceships 
Blue Tassles - Authority to Commandeer any sailing Vessel 
Boots - The Sovereign Protection against Paralysis of the Lower Body 
Brass Buttons - The Ignition button for Aeroplanes 
Cloak - The Sovereign Protection against Paralysis of the Upper Body 
Green Idol - An Effective Defence against Magical Sleep. 
Helm - For a Mystical Vision of the Land as a Whole. 
Quicksword - The Sword Enilno allows double the Attack Speed 
Ring - Protection from Magical Fields 
Skull Key - The Key to Control an Aeroplane 
Strange Coin - The mere act of Rubbing this Coin Negates the Passage of Time Itself! 
Tools - Those Devices Required for Escape from Traps 
Torch - Illumination in Deepest Darkness 
Tri-Lithium - A Rare Mineral Required to Fuel Spaceships. 
Lower Wessex/Devon

Bampton Castle - wooden motte & bailey burned to the ground by Stephen in 1136 (haunted?)
Barnstaple Castle - Norman motte & bailey, first stone structures built by Henry de Tracey, a support of Stephen’s, priory just outside its walls
Bickleigh Castle - Norman motte & bailey pulled down sometime in the middle of the century, Norman chapel (which is not torn down) built on the foundations of a Saxon chapel some 500 years older
Cranmore Castle - Iron Age ruins
Lydford Castle - The second castle was built on the site of the original Norma motte&bailey in c. 1132 AD. It was a 3-storey tower, commanding a strategic view over much of the surrounding countryside, and was eminently defensible, with Lydford Gorge on one side, and the land sloping steeply away from it.  The 1.5 mile long Gorge features 100’ White Lady Waterfall and the Devil’s Cauldron whirlpools.
Okehampton Castle - Norman motte & bailey
Plympton Castle - ?
Rougemont Castle - Exonbury (Exeter), built in 1068, perched over an ancient volcanic plug, overlaying remains of the Roman city of Isca Dumnoniorum. The castle is named after the red stone found in the hill, and used in the construction of the original buildings
Tiverton Castle - Norman motte & bailey somewhat upgraded with stone
Totnes Castle - Norman motte & bailey
Winkleigh Castle - ?


Mid Wessex/Wiltshire
Ashton Keynes Castle - motte-&-bailey owned by the Keynes family
Barbury Castle - Iron Age ruins
Castle Combe - motte & bailey on limestone spur with five baileys!
xDevizes Castle - original motte & bailey built by Osmund, Bishop of Salisbury in 1080, burnt down in 1113, rebuilt by Roger, Bishop of Salisbury in 1120 as the most splendid castle in Europe, castle was taken and retaken during the Anarchy
Ludgershall Castle - ?
The Mount (a.k.a. Marlborough Castle) - royal castle, Norman motte & bailey on prehistoric mound, John FitzGilbert the Marshal held Marlborough Castle for Stephen
xSarum Castle -  site of the earliest known settlement in Salisbury, going back to 3000 BC, Iron Age hill fort, Roman stronghold, Saxon fortress, now royal palace, cathedral & bishops residence on western end of town


North Wessex/Berkshire
Beaumys Castle - ?
Brightwell Castle - built by Stephen in 1145, destroyed by Curtmantle in 1153
Faringdon Castle - over an iron age fort, built by Robert of Gloucester in 1144, soon after besieged by Stephen, castellan Brian de Soulis surrendered after 4 days, completely destroyed a year or two later
FitsHarris Castle - ?
Hampstead Marshall Castle - ? probably another of John Marshal’s castles (see below)
Hinton Waldrist Castle - timber motte-&-bailey built by the St. Valery family
Moreton Castle - ?
Newbury Castle - adulterine castle built by John Marshal during the Anarchy, Stephen beseiges it in 1152, holding John’s son William hostage and threatening to catapult the lad over the walls.   "I have the anvils and the hammer to forge still better sons." Stephen relented.
Wallingham Castle - nigh-impregnable fortress of Brian FitzCount, supporter of Maud, Stephen's forces attacked it many times, before he was in turn attacked by Curtmantle, contains the prison Cloere Brien
Windsor Castle - already a Royal Castle, only a wooden motte&bailey with timber palisade but the motte is a steep 50ft high and the surrounding moat is commensurately large
Woodhay Castle - ?

Outer Wessex/Somerset
Cary Castle - Norman motte & bailey owned by the Perceval family, beseiged by Stephen in both 1138 and 1153
Castle Neroch - Norman motte & bailey built over Bronze and Stone Age site
Crewkerne Castle - reputed Norman motte & bailey
Daw’s Castle - Iron Age site, rebuilt & fortified by King Alfred in 878, later site of a Saxon mint, now in ruins
Dunster Castle - Norman motte & bailey built over Saxon fort, home of the de Mohun family
Stogursey Castle - ?
Taunton Castle - site destroyed Saxon turned into an Augistinian Priory, in 1138 Henry de Blois transforms the manor house here into a fullblown stone castle

South Wessex/Dorset
Christchurch Castle - Norman motte & bailey built over an Anglo-Saxon fort from the 10th century.  Rebuilt in stone by Baldwin de Redvers in 1147.
xCorfe Castle - Norman motte & bailey built over an earlier fort, St. Edward the Marytyr assassinated here March 18, 978. Commands a gap in the Purbeck Hills. The majority of the road traffic to and from the Swanage area passes below the battlements of the castle.
xCasterbridge [Dorchester] Castle - Norman motte & bailey
xSherton [Sherborne] Castle - castle palace built by Roger de Caen, Bishop of Melchester [Salisbury]

Upper Wessex/Hampshire
Ashley Castle - built by Henry de Blois, Bishop of Wintoncester in 1138 on the site of an Iron Age fort 
Portchester Castle - new stonework castle built on site of former Norman motte & bailey, Saxon fort and Roman fort; owned by William Pont de l'Arche, outer bailey includes a church run by an Augustinian priory
Wintonchester [Winchester] Castler - founded in 1067, houses the Round Table?
Wolvesey Castle - built by Henry de Blois, Bishop of Wintoncester  between 1130 and 1140, scene of the Route of Wintoncester

The Island/Inisguerth/Isle of Wight
Clarisbrooke Castle - de Redvers, over ancient Tomb of Wihtgar, nephew of King Cynric, donkey-powered wellhouse hides the lost Mohune Diamond (Mohunestone?)

Off Wessex/Cornwall
Caerhays Castle - semi-castellated manor owned by the Arundell family
Launceston Castle - Norman motte & bailey with updated stone keep, formerly administrative headquarters for the Earls of Cornwall, whose last member lost a dispute with Henry in 1106, now monster infested?
Restormel - either a perfectly circular stone castle in a deer park overlooking a river and a Judges Guild module!
St Michael’s Mount - fortified island monastery of Benedictines
Tintagel Castle - ancient ruins previously occupied by Romans and the ancient Dumnones, obvious Arthurian connections (secret Morgan Le Fay dungeon?) Thomas Hardy: The Famous Tragedy of the Queen of Cornwall at Tintagel in Lyonnesse, a one act play which was published in 1923 (the book included an imaginary drawing of the castle at the period).  Nearby is a place called Merlin’s Cave
Trematon Castle - Anglo-Norman, built in a style similar to Restormel, over ruins of a Roman fort, held by the Valletort family, distant relations to the Counts of Mortain (Stephen)